Musical Video: Atanasio Hatchuen

Last week, we listened to Brocxa-Kussundé; this week we will listen to Gumbé (the genre that usually defines the music of Guinea-Bissau).

However, the word Gumbé means a cylinder (sikó) full of water topped by a calabash (see picture below: the instrument right in the middle of the group - yellow), that was reintroduced in Africa around 1800, when a group of slaves was released in Jamaica, and then transported to Sierra Leon in a boat. 

According to Professor Lucy Duran, musicologist at the University of London, Gumbé was the first African folk music.
Several ethnicities within Guinea-Bissau (including the ones of Muslim tradition - Mandinga, Fula etc) use it as a unifying factor - since it is a rythm common to all of them. 




However, the word Gumbé means a cylinder (sikó) full of water topped by a calabash (see picture below: the instrument right in the middle of the group - yellow), that was reintroduced in Africa around 1800, when a group of slaves was released in Jamaica, and then transported to Sierra Leon in a boat. 

According to Professor Lucy Duran, musicologist at the University of London, Gumbé was the first African folk music.
Several ethnicities within Guinea-Bissau (including the ones of Muslim tradition - Mandinga, Fula etc) use it as a unifying factor - since it is a rythm common to all of them. 

But enough of conversation...let's visualise and listen to the video below: it is by Atanasio Hatchuen (a Guinean singer) and it is entitled "Camba Mar". 
The rythm of this video is contagious (it got me dancing, as I prepared this post), and the women in it can shake it!




Have a Blessed Weekend!

Comments

  1. They sure can shake it......it's all in the rear and those rears can move. It sounds like a combination of African and Caribbean. I really enjoyed it!!

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  2. This music reminds listeners about the power of spontaneity and natural responses to external stimuli. This is part of a process of awakening to things beyond the ordinary, everyday human experience. You must forget what you hav been taught in order to remmeber what you hide deep within your soul.

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  3. Lol, "and the women in it can shake it", amen sister.

    Thanks, another great video. Hey max do you remember Paul Simon's Graceland album? and I say album because I bought the analog version when it came out, given the choice Id rather buy albums then digital,anyways I love this type of music, so refreshing.

    Have great week , the video got me off to a super start.

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  4. Hey Mel,

    Oh yeah...! It is amazing!

    Yes, the Caribbean music has a lot of influences from the Mother Land because of the slaves, who took the rhythm with them...

    I am glad you enjoyed it, buddy :D!

    Cheers

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  5. Hi Liara :D!

    "You must forget what you hav been taught in order to remmeber what you hide deep within your soul."

    So true, darling!

    Thanks for the words of wisdom! :D

    Cheers

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  6. Hey Bob :D!

    "Lol, "and the women in it can shake it", amen sister."

    LOL LOL Amen!

    "Thanks, another great video. Hey max do you remember Paul Simon's Graceland album? and I say album because I bought the analog version when it came out, given the choice Id rather buy albums then digital,anyways I love this type of music, so refreshing."

    You are welcome! Yes, I do remember that album...how can one forget? The group Ladysmith Black Mambazo is in it...magical (I just love their music)!!
    We are in agreement, brother...I also love this type of music :D!

    "Have great week , the video got me off to a super start."

    Thanks, Lord of the Astropics! :D I am glad to hear that!

    Have a blessed week!

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  7. What a lively music! Thanks for sharing Max, many of us are unfamiliar with Gumbe.

    Have a great week ahead. :)

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  8. Hi Liza,

    You are welcome, darling :D!!
    I am glad you liked it!

    Thanks, you too!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete

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