Musical Video: "Canto meu Sonho" By Paulo Flores

As I have told you last week (Here), there are three main rythms in Angola: Semba, Kizomba and Kuduro.


But let's start by Semba.


Semba is a traditional sound, that is the predecessor of not only Kizomba, and Kuduro, but also of Samba (from Brazil).
Its theme is diversified: social activities, daily life, personal stories, tradition and politics.
This genre allows the artist to convey its emotions, and because of this peculiarity, Semba is always a must in every Angolan party.


In the video below you will listen to Paulo Flores, an Angolan artist, singing "Canta meu Sonho" (Sing my Dream).
Since the lyrics to this song were no where to be found, allow me to offer you a quick synopsis:


He is asking his granny to tell him the stories about the "mulatas" of Benguela (the mixed girls of Benguela), of the fishermen, of the tradition; he asks his granny to teach him the Kimbundu (a dialect). He also asks her to tell him about the women of Cabinda, of several places in Angola; of how she danced to the sound of Semba with her boyfriend; to tell him about witchcraft...all that contributed to the birth of the Semba.


But enough of conversation...let's listen to what Semba is all about.




Comments

  1. Canta meu Sonho: sing my dream, right?

    Totally reminds me of Brazilian samba!

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  2. Geez, no wonder why you guys dance everywhere, great music and it's got a beat,lol, and thanks for the translation. Again for me especially music speaks volumes about a culture.

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  3. Interesting beat and rhythm. THANKS for the introduction, Max!!! :-D This Tuesday I'll start my Finnish classes again, twice a week HO HO HO HO...but still helping out the rest of the time at the library. PERFECT! ;-D

    (((HUGS)))

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  4. Thanks for introducing us to this and with an interesting history.

    I can tell its a lot of Latin American rhythm in this and I've loved dancing samba from when I was young - even competed like a dancer :-)

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  5. Hey Zhu :D!

    Right: that is it! :D

    It does, indeed! You have a good ear for music, girl!!!

    How's things in Brazil?

    Cheers

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  6. Hey Bob :D!

    "Geez, no wonder why you guys dance everywhere, great music and it's got a beat,lol, and thanks for the translation. Again for me especially music speaks volumes about a culture."

    LOL indeed, with music like this, it is impossible not to dance wherever we are. You are welcome, Bob!
    For me too: I can breathe a culture by its music and dance!

    Bob, it is a pleasure to post these videos just to hear your opinion, man! :D

    Thanks!

    Cheers

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  7. Hey Gorgeous!

    "Interesting beat and rhythm. THANKS for the introduction, Max!!! :-D This Tuesday I'll start my Finnish classes again, twice a week HO HO HO HO...but still helping out the rest of the time at the library. PERFECT! ;-D"

    :D I am glad you liked it! You are most welcome, darling!
    So, you will start another class, eh? That is awesome!! :D It IS perfect!!

    Thanks for having dropped by, I missed you!

    *Hugs*!

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  8. Hey Renny :D!

    "Thanks for introducing us to this and with an interesting history."

    You are most welcome, my friend!

    "I can tell its a lot of Latin American rhythm in this and I've loved dancing samba from when I was young - even competed like a dancer :-)"

    It's the other way around...Latin American music has a lot of semba (since it is the seed).
    You competed as a dancer? Now, Renny...you are a box full of surprises, man!! :D Wow!

    Impressed I am, impressed I leave you...

    Cheers

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  9. I love listening to Samba. Thanks for letting us know about this traditional music. I almost danced while listening. :D lol

    Have a great week! *hugs*

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  10. Hey Liza,

    Samba is just awesome! :D

    You should have danced, girl! This is what these videos are posted for lol ;)!

    Thanks, beautiful!

    *Hugs*!

    Cheers

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