Video: Introduction to the Batuku

You have been introduced, in last week's article, to funáná. This week I will introduce you to another traditional Cape Verdean musical genre: Batuque

The Batuque (or Batuku in Creole; played by women [the Batukaderas], who clap hands or slap a cloth) is the oldest musical genre that stems from the African continent. The Portuguese administration, and the Church, were heavily against the Batuque because it was considered sinful or even too "African". This antagonism lasted until the fascist era in Portugal (during the 50's it  nearly "died"). 
During the 90's the Batuku experienced a re-birth...but enough of talking...just experience this genre by visualising the video below: 




Comments

  1. That is so cool! I can't even walk and chew gum at the same time, but this comes so naturally to them. I remember once when I was visiting in Puerto Rico, one of my husband's relatives there said, "Most people from the mainland think they can dance like us, but they can't." I agree with her, this is something you learn from when you are a little child. You feel it in your bones! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey Delirious! :D

    "That is so cool! I can't even walk and chew gum at the same time, but this comes so naturally to them."

    Yes, it is. lol It comes naturally to them because they start dancing as little kids.

    "I remember once when I was visiting in Puerto Rico, one of my husband's relatives there said, "Most people from the mainland think they can dance like us, but they can't." I agree with her, this is something you learn from when you are a little child. You feel it in your bones! :)"

    LOL You know, Africans say the same thing about the Portuguese. It is true, we start as babies.
    lol Yes, we feel it in our bones :)!

    D, thank you so much for this awesome comment! :D

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Max! I'm feeling sorry for myself after undergoing Mohs surgery to my poor old nose.

    The music clip has brightened my morning up for me, you'll be happy to hear. Yes, it's 5am here and it's about time I went to bed.

    African music was first introduced to me in the epic movie, "Zulu" and later on by Paul Simon.

    I mightn't know what they're saying in the clip nor that movie, but the beat, the rhythm, the chanting and the dancing tells me a great deal of what they are trying to convey.

    Again, I am indebted to you for broadening my knowledge of others that live far away from Downunder.

    Take Care,
    Peter

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Peter!

    "I'm feeling sorry for myself after undergoing Mohs surgery to my poor old nose."

    You underwent a surgery!? What happened to your nose, mate? :(

    "The music clip has brightened my morning up for me, you'll be happy to hear. Yes, it's 5am here and it's about time I went to bed."

    I am happy to hear that (you got it right) :D! 5am...oh my...here it is 18:22...I wish you to have a nice rest, my friend! :)

    "African music was first introduced to me in the epic movie, "Zulu" and later on by Paul Simon."

    "Zulu" is an awesome movie! Ah, Paul Simon and the Ladysmith Black Mambazo....Ace (yes, I told you I'd study the list you gave me)!!

    "I mightn't know what they're saying in the clip nor that movie, but the beat, the rhythm, the chanting and the dancing tells me a great deal of what they are trying to convey."

    Ah, they are singing about immigration and how it hurts to be away from the relatives who go abroad to seek for a better life opportunity, but one must keep her hopes high and the faith that they will return one day...

    "Again, I am indebted to you for broadening my knowledge of others that live far away from Downunder."

    Oh, Peter...you are too kind :)! It is my pleasure to share these things with you (for they are a part of my world too) *bowing*!

    Take care, my friend!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Dissecting Society welcomes all sorts of comments, as we are strong advocates of freedom of speech; however, we reserve the right to delete Troll Activity; libellous and offensive comments (e.g. racist and anti-Semitic) plus those with excessive foul language. This blog does not view vulgarity as being protected by the right to free speech. Cheers