The Lusosphere: Portugal



Portugal: the nucleus. The country of the Discovery Era (1415- 1557). It fought against enraged and unknown seas; it discovered & traded with half the world; it invented the nonius (Pedro Nunes); it opened the doors to a new epoch – it brought us all together.
But this great feat alone, does not define the Portuguese people. For you to understand, in depth, the Portuguese, how they think life, how they feel it, how they breathe it; how they express it, what really defines them, you need to know two words (that were born during the discovery Era, when men would sail boats for months, years even; and their mothers, fiancées, wives, children would stay behind): Fado and saudade.

Fado: it derives from the Latin word “Fatum, fati” and it means fate, fortune, fatality; and a traditional song from Lisbon sang in a sad & fatalistic fashion (as if crying for all the lives lost in building our nation, in spreading our language, in building & fighting for our colonies; mourning for every Portuguese soul that has taken the “black boat”).
Portugal understood that sacrifices have to be made in order to conquer the seas, yet it cried and still cries. A lot was conquered but much more was lost. The country has covered its heart with a black shawl and sings the Fado.

Saudade: there is no other word like this one, in any other language; so its translation is very hard to make, because even if translated into longing, missing someone or something; it doesn’t convey the proper sentiment that the Portuguese confer to it.
When watching their men, sons, fathers leaving in the boats...saudade would start kicking in...Living for months and years away from them burned inside; the melancholy it generated inside killed each cell at a time...

But for a better understanding of these two so very Portuguese words, please watch the video below.
It is a Fado called “Barco Negro” (Black Boat) and it is interpreted by Mariza. She is a sister, not only as a human being; but also because she was born in the same country as I was (Mozambique), in the same city (Maputo), her family comes from the same region as mine (Inhambane) and we were both brought to this country where we grew up, a country we love, enriched and were enriched by...
Enjoy!




This is Saudade!

For the Lyrics & its translation, click Here!

Next Port: Cape Verde

Comments

  1. Hi, Gorgeous!

    When I first heard the first few words of the song, they sent goosebumps all over. SO powerful! The singer is VERY good in expressing the soul of the song.

    And THANKS for the lesson on Fado and Saudade he he...

    ReplyDelete
  2. That was BEAUTIFUL! Thanks for sharing. I'm still not sure I fully understand the meaning of Saudade, but I know how difficult some words are to translate.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Amel! :D

    "When I first heard the first few words of the song, they sent goosebumps all over. SO powerful! The singer is VERY good in expressing the soul of the song."

    I know what you mean: it is a powerful song! Yes, she is excellent! You know, I never liked fado, but after listening to Mariza I began to listen to it, and like it!

    "And THANKS for the lesson on Fado and Saudade he he..."

    You are welcome, darling :D!

    I am glad you liked it! And thanks for having dropped by, gorgeous :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hey D! :D

    "That was BEAUTIFUL! Thanks for sharing."

    It is, isn't it? You are most welcome *bowing*!

    "I'm still not sure I fully understand the meaning of Saudade, but I know how difficult some words are to translate."

    I understand what you mean...my husband told me that one can only learn the meaning of Saudade after spending a considerable time in Portugal (he is not Portuguese).
    In this case, words are not difficult to translate, but the sentiment is...for it is a very Portuguese thing, I suppose!

    D, thanks for having dropped by and shared your thoughts on this :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  5. Max,
    WOW......the setting, the singer and the song, and the music were both captivating, mesmerizing and haunting. I will come back to this video quite often.

    Thanks for sharing the soul of Portugal.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Mel :D!

    "WOW......the setting, the singer and the song, and the music were both captivating, mesmerizing and haunting. I will come back to this video quite often."

    Yes, fado sang by Mariza is rather captivating and mesmerising! Please do; me, myself and I listen to it quite often...
    Perhaps you haven't read the Introduction to this series, but every week (as a bonus) I will be posting a music video with music from countries belonging to the Lusosphere.

    "Thanks for sharing the soul of Portugal."

    You are welcome, Mel *bowing*!

    And thank you for having dropped by and shared your impressions on this article :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hello Max….

    Is this series going to be posted every Tuesday instead of your other kinds of Tuesday articles or along with them?

    The illustrious history of Portugal is a wonderful tableau for you to guide us on a tour along….

    Ancient Rome held Fortuna in a place of primacy. It is interesting that the Portuguese people have such a fatalistic view. I like the way you “decorated” the Fado passage…

    Saudade: How about intense prolonged yearning? Perhaps a lingering dread that reunion will not occur? Once again a wonderfuly worded passage..

    Fabulous video/song! I enjoyed many encores! Wonderful voice, music and setting! Loved her hair! Very classy and elegant…Since you two have so much in common do you also look and dress alike? When she said she was going to introduce her friends I thought you were going to be on stage….

    Encore Maximus!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Max,
    A wonderful start to the history of Portugal.

    "Fado: it derives from the Latin word “Fatum, fati” and it means fate, fortune, fatality; and a traditional song from Lisbon sang in a sad & fatalistic fashion (as if crying for all the lives lost in building our nation, in spreading our language, in building & fighting for our colonies; mourning for every Portuguese soul that has taken the “black boat”)."

    I feel that I am sailing into it's heart where all of it's sorrow and joy lies. Where the blood of Portugal drips the tears of generations spilled onto the soil.

    "Saudade: there is no other word like this one, in any other language; so its translation is very hard to make, because even if translated into longing, missing someone or something; it doesn’t convey the proper sentiment that the Portuguese confer to it. When watching their men, sons, fathers leaving in the boats...saudade would start kicking in...Living for months and years away from them burned inside; the melancholy it generated inside killed each cell at a time."

    How is saudade pronounced phonetically?

    I am imagining if I were there and my heart is singing a dirge. To live with so much sadness and uncertainty is quite a harsh way to live, especially when hopes are shattered and dreams unfulfilled, but alas love never dies.

    "It is a Fado called “Barco Negro” (Black Boat) and it is interpreted by Mariza. She is a sister, not only as a human being; but also because she was born in the same country as I was (Mozambique), in the same city (Maputo), her family comes from the same region as mine (Inhambane) and we were both brought to this country where we grew up, a country we love, enriched and were enriched by."

    Beautiful sister and song. I felt the black tears in which she sang. I like how the drums and guitar undercut the haunting emotional fever in her Soul and how she never abandoned the love in her heart. I also love the lyrics, especially,

    "In the warmth of berth, in empty benches,
    In my bosom, you're always with me..."

    Excellent post. I wish I could have had you as a history teacher when I was in school, maybe I would have actually liked it. Thank you Max. Muito Obrigada, my darling.

    Liberating Portugal Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hello LS :D!

    "Is this series going to be posted every Tuesday instead of your other kinds of Tuesday articles or along with them?"

    No, this series will be posted once a month (ah, you didn't read the introduction)...my usual Tuesday articles will proceed, don't worry :)!

    "The illustrious history of Portugal is a wonderful tableau for you to guide us on a tour along…."

    Thank you *bowing*! I think you will enjoy the ride...

    "Ancient Rome held Fortuna in a place of primacy. It is interesting that the Portuguese people have such a fatalistic view. I like the way you “decorated” the Fado passage…"

    Indeed, the Portuguese, in the past, have dramatised life in a such a way that it was transported to today's life. It is quite interesting to watch political debates in CNN, BBC and then watch a Portuguese political debate...the differences are appalling! And when they invite the people to participate it is even more interesting, because then you are able to realise the "Fado" in their opinions and in the way they share those same opinions...very interesting.
    Thank you, LS *bowing*!

    "Saudade: How about intense prolonged yearning? Perhaps a lingering dread that reunion will not occur? Once again a wonderfuly worded passage.."

    Prolonged yearning could be a way of defining it, but it lacks that pain, that drama, the suffering from being apart. Aaah, but there is where it lies the secret: the person having saudade, even though it knows that the reunion will not occur (in the case of departing sailors), denies that such possibility may turn into reality...no, as long as saudade remains in her/his bosom the love, the care, the tenderness will live forever (thus having the illusion that the lover is present or alive).
    Thanks, LS...I am glad you loved it :D!

    "Fabulous video/song! I enjoyed many encores! Wonderful voice, music and setting! Loved her hair! Very classy and elegant…Since you two have so much in common do you also look and dress alike? When she said she was going to introduce her friends I thought you were going to be on stage…."

    It is, isn't it? Oh, since I prepared this post (a week and half ago) I have been listening to this song non-stop! She has an incredible voice; she was the first Portuguese artist to actually prepare a stunning designer wardrobe for her shows (the Portuguese designer João Rolo does all her stage dresses); and she was also the first Fado singer to dye her hair (because usually, Fado singers have either black or dark brown hair) and present such a characteristic hair-style!
    LOL LOL no, LS...I don't look like her (for I don't dye my hair); I also dress in black, but I don't wear dresses nor shawls.
    LOL LOL LOL you are cute...

    I must introduce you to the Fado Diva: Amália! She sung Fado in a whole different way (Amália sung in a suffered, painful tone; whereas Mariza sings saudade in a loving tone).

    "Encore Maximus!"

    Thank you, LS...*throwing roses*!

    LS, thanks for this awesome comment...your feedback encourages me to proceed :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Alexys :D!

    "A wonderful start to the history of Portugal."

    Thank you *bowing*!

    "I feel that I am sailing into it's heart where all of it's sorrow and joy lies. Where the blood of Portugal drips the tears of generations spilled onto the soil."

    Exactly! You are feeling it, sista!!

    "How is saudade pronounced phonetically?"

    "sʌu:da:'də" (phonetic symbols for English - is it understandable?).

    "I am imagining if I were there and my heart is singing a dirge. To live with so much sadness and uncertainty is quite a harsh way to live, especially when hopes are shattered and dreams unfulfilled, but alas love never dies."

    Again, you hit the nail on its head: despite the sadness and uncertainty it is believed that love never dies! It is as if they chose to live with pain, and saudade, so that love may never die...never fade. As if the black shawl represented the protection of that love.

    "Beautiful sister and song. I felt the black tears in which she sang. I like how the drums and guitar undercut the haunting emotional fever in her Soul and how she never abandoned the love in her heart."

    Indeed! Yes, I think that Mariza misses her country...but knows that she can never go back there, because her heart has learned how to love Portugal (it is one of those situations where you love your birth place, but you can't let go of the place that raised and nurtured you). Ah, the drums are the African influence...the original Fado (sung by the Fado Diva, Amália) doesn't include drums; but Mariza suggested that her African heritage would be included in her version - and it worked wonders!

    "I also love the lyrics, especially, "In the warmth of berth, in empty benches/ In my bosom, you're always with me...""

    It's my favourite part as well! It's gorgeous!

    "Excellent post. I wish I could have had you as a history teacher when I was in school, maybe I would have actually liked it. Thank you Max. Muito Obrigada, my darling."

    Thank you, darling *bowing*! Oh, you are too kind...I only had one good history teacher (in Junior High School), all the rest stunk *nodding*.
    You are welcome, darling :D! De nada, querida (= darling or dear)!

    Lady A, muito obrigada for your comment and for your encouragement...I appreciate it a lot :D!

    Discovering Portugal Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Max,

    "sʌu:da:'də" (phonetic symbols for English - is it understandable?)."

    What does it rhyme with in English? I would read it as 'saw dah de', but it is not the same unless I hear it.

    "Again, you hit the nail on its head: despite the sadness and uncertainty it is believed that love never dies! It is as if they chose to live with pain, and saudade, so that love may never die...never fade. As if the black shawl represented the protection of that love.'

    Very interesting.

    "Indeed! Yes, I think that Mariza misses her country...but knows that she can never go back there, because her heart has learned how to love Portugal (it is one of those situations where you love your birth place, but you can't let go of the place that raised and nurtured you). Ah, the drums are the African influence...the original Fado (sung by the Fado Diva, Amália) doesn't include drums; but Mariza suggested that her African heritage would be included in her version - and it worked wonders!"

    I am mesmerized by the history and background. It is what builds character in people and stories.

    "It's my favourite part as well! It's gorgeous!"

    Absolutely.

    "Thank you, darling *bowing*! Oh, you are too kind...I only had one good history teacher (in Junior High School), all the rest stunk *nodding*."

    ROFL. I know EXACTLY what you mean. My history teacher was also the physical education instructor.

    "You are welcome, darling :D! De nada, querida (= darling or dear)!"

    Thank you. I have noticed that the language of Portuguese is similar to Spanish as far as certain words, but I guess that is somewhat common in many languages.

    Sailing The Seas To Portugal Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  12. Saudações..

    estou de volta com o Entrando numa Fria..não sei se ainda lembra de mim...

    Parabens...

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Lady A!

    "What does it rhyme with in English? I would read it as 'saw dah de', but it is not the same unless I hear it."

    Hmmm let me see...I don't see any word in English that can rhyme with it; but do you know that French word "malade"? It rhymes with it!
    Yes, you read it well! Listen to the word here (follow the lyrics below, to catch the word): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_NYrI1Mt9I

    "Vai minha tristeza,
    e diz a ela que sem ela não pode ser,
    diz-lhe, numa prece
    Que ela regresse, porque eu não posso Mais sofrer.
    Chega, de saudade"
    ("Go away sadness,/ and tell her that without her it doesn't work/ tell her, in a prayer/ that she must return, because I can't suffer any longer/ Enough saudade.")
    "I am mesmerized by the history and background. It is what builds character in people and stories."

    It is amazing, isn't it? I agree, darling!

    "ROFL. I know EXACTLY what you mean. My history teacher was also the physical education instructor."

    LOL...Word? A physical education instructor, for real?

    "Thank you. I have noticed that the language of Portuguese is similar to Spanish as far as certain words, but I guess that is somewhat common in many languages."

    Don't mention it! Yes, it is similar to Spanish, and nearly the same as Galician (from Galicia, in North of Spain, who now want to belong to Portugal). Well, Latin languages are all similar...let me offer you an example: home, house = casa (Portuguese and Italian - for it is pronounced the same way "caza"), casa (Spanish, it is pronounced with the sound of an "S" like "cassa").

    Sailing The Seas From Portugal Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  14. Oi Philip Rangel :D!

    "estou de volta com o Entrando numa Fria..não sei se ainda lembra de mim..."

    Acho que sim...falámos no ano passado, não foi? Há quanto tempo :D! O teu Blog era um outro!

    "Parabens..."

    Obrigada :D!

    Vou dar uma checkada no teu novo blog! Obrigada por teres vindo...

    Um abraço

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi Max,
    Thanks for that link. I think I have it now.

    English equivalent is (phonetically) sau - as in vowel sound cow + dodge = saudade.

    Thanks for the language lesson. :D

    Hail Max Cheers.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi Lady A!

    "Thanks for that link. I think I have it now."

    Anytime, darling :D!

    "English equivalent is (phonetically) sau - as in vowel sound cow + dodge = saudade."

    Yes, that is the Brazilian Portuguese, the Portuguese from Portugal is like the one I gave you yesterday (we close our vowels; whereas Africans and Brazilians open them).

    "Thanks for the language lesson. :D"

    You are welcome, lovely A :D!

    Throwing flowers Cheers.

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  17. Max:

    Thank you for including this write up and this moving video. It was fantastic. I didn't understand the words, but I definitely understand the feeling in my heart.

    Happy trails.

    ReplyDelete
  18. We need your people's passion to discover once again. I went to to your link to understand better about the words, I got the meaning from the words but the passion from the video, very beautiful. Learned a little about your culture today, wow we are all so different , makes life a little more interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Max, I have to run out but I'll be over later to read your post! xxxx

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hey Swu :D!

    "Thank you for including this write up and this moving video. It was fantastic. I didn't understand the words, but I definitely understand the feeling in my heart."

    You are most welcome, buddy! I am glad you liked it...it's a way to share my culture with the world.
    Well, if you felt it in your heart, then you understood the whole thing :)!

    Swu, thank you so much for your feedback; I appreciate it *bowing*!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hey Bob :D!

    "We need your people's passion to discover once again."

    I hear you, Lord of the Astropics! I hear you!

    "I went to to your link to understand better about the words, I got the meaning from the words but the passion from the video, very beautiful."

    :D that is great, Bob! It is beautiful indeed..

    "Learned a little about your culture today, wow we are all so different , makes life a little more interesting."

    We are different yet equal...but like you said our cultural differences are what renders life more interesting (I hope we never lose this cultural differences)!

    Bob, thank you so very much for your comment; I appreciate it a lot *bowing*!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi Lynda :D!

    "Max, I have to run out but I'll be over later to read your post! xxxx"

    All right, darling...no problem!! xxxx

    Thanks for the quick visit :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  23. well, i'm portuguese...
    so thx Max to stand up for us!
    great music food weather people and me!

    até já!
    gallardo

    ReplyDelete
  24. Olá Gallardo!!

    "well, i'm portuguese...so thx Max to stand up for us! great music food weather people and me!"

    :D why, G...de nada, pá! Portugal is a great country that needs and deserves to be promoted!!
    Oh yeah....excellent food, music, weather (December and 16ºC? This is great!), people and us LOL ;)!

    "até já!"

    Até já!

    Gallardo, thank you so much for having dropped by...it is always a pleasure to see you, a countryman, here at MAX :D!

    Tchau!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Max, I commented here earlier but for some reason it got lost! I need to watch that--it keeps happening to me these past two weeks or so. I don't know if it's Blogger or something on my end, like my browser etc.

    I had said that I thought "saudade" would be the equivalent of "grievous pining" if translated into English, but I don't know if that's the right shade of meaning.

    At any rate, your friend has a marvelous voice and ability to project emotion in her use of it. The similarity of your backgrounds is amazing! It seems you are fated to be friends!

    Max, I think it's great that you are sharing some of your cultlure with us!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hey Lynda :D!

    "Max, I commented here earlier but for some reason it got lost! I need to watch that--it keeps happening to me these past two weeks or so. I don't know if it's Blogger or something on my end, like my browser etc."

    Oh no...that used to happen a lot to me too, but now I never leave without checking that my comment passed through or not! I don't know why that happens *nodding*!

    "I had said that I thought "saudade" would be the equivalent of "grievous pining" if translated into English, but I don't know if that's the right shade of meaning."

    "Grievous pining" would be a good translation, but still not it...because "grievous pining" doesn't leave much room for joy, whereas saudade does. It is a quite paradoxal word, but that is what the Portuguese came up with lol: they were grieving because their loved ones were away (conquering the seas), because they died, but at the same time they were happy and joyous because of the importance of their departure...

    "At any rate, your friend has a marvelous voice and ability to project emotion in her use of it. The similarity of your backgrounds is amazing! It seems you are fated to be friends!"

    She does have a great voice! It is amazing, isn't it? We never know... darling...

    "Max, I think it's great that you are sharing some of your cultlure with us!"

    Oh, thank you, darling *bowing*! I am just glad you liked it!

    Lynda, thank you so much for your delightful comment: I loved it :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  27. Hi Max….

    You said:
    No, this series will be posted once a month (ah, you didn't read the introduction)...my usual Tuesday articles will proceed, don't worry :)!

    I respond:
    *okey-dokey*

    I said:
    "Ancient Rome held Fortuna in a place of primacy. It is interesting that the Portuguese people have such a fatalistic view. I like the way you “decorated” the Fado passage…"

    You said:
    Indeed, the Portuguese, in the past, have dramatised life in a such a way that it was transported to today's life. It is quite interesting to watch political debates in CNN, BBC and then watch a Portuguese political debate...the differences are appalling! And when they invite the people to participate it is even more interesting, because then you are able to realise the "Fado" in their opinions and in the way they share those same opinions...very interesting.
    Thank you, LS *bowing*!

    I respond:
    it must at times be quite frustrating engaging with this kind of culture, while trying to move forward….

    I said:
    "Saudade: How about intense prolonged yearning? Perhaps a lingering dread that reunion will not occur? Once again a wonderfuly worded passage.."

    You said:
    Prolonged yearning could be a way of defining it, but it lacks that pain, that drama, the suffering from being apart. Aaah, but there is where it lies the secret: the person having saudade, even though it knows that the reunion will not occur (in the case of departing sailors), denies that such possibility may turn into reality...no, as long as saudade remains in her/his bosom the love, the care, the tenderness will live forever (thus having the illusion that the lover is present or alive).
    Thanks, LS...I am glad you loved it :D!

    I respond:
    LOL, very interesting and very different approach than the way most British persons responded in similar situations in the same era….

    I said:
    "Fabulous video/song! I enjoyed many encores! Wonderful voice, music and setting! Loved her hair! Very classy and elegant…Since you two have so much in common do you also look and dress alike? When she said she was going to introduce her friends I thought you were going to be on stage…."

    You said:
    It is, isn't it? Oh, since I prepared this post (a week and half ago) I have been listening to this song non-stop! She has an incredible voice; she was the first Portuguese artist to actually prepare a stunning designer wardrobe for her shows (the Portuguese designer João Rolo does all her stage dresses); and she was also the first Fado singer to dye her hair (because usually, Fado singers have either black or dark brown hair) and present such a characteristic hair-style!
    LOL LOL no, LS...I don't look like her (for I don't dye my hair); I also dress in black, but I don't wear dresses nor shawls.
    LOL LOL LOL you are cute...

    I respond:
    She's extremely talented…. how about vests? :)

    You said:
    I must introduce you to the Fado Diva: Amália! She sung Fado in a whole different way (Amália sung in a suffered, painful tone; whereas Mariza sings saudade in a loving tone).

    I respond:
    Bring it on!

    I said:
    "Encore Maximus!"

    You said:
    Thank you, LS...*throwing roses*!

    I respond:
    LOL, with or without thorns? LOL

    You said:
    LS, thanks for this awesome comment...your feedback encourages me to proceed :D!

    I respond:
    LOL, excellent. You should be very encouraged!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Hi LS! :)

    So nice to hear from you, darling!

    "*okey-dokey*"

    LOL...

    "it must at times be quite frustrating engaging with this kind of culture, while trying to move forward…."

    I confess that it is, sometimes...but people like me and Gallardo (who spend half their time criticising the country in a constructive fashion) are hopeful that one day it will move forward and Portugal will restore its past "glory".

    "LOL, very interesting and very different approach than the way most British persons responded in similar situations in the same era…."

    Well, the Portuguese are the Portuguese.

    "She's extremely talented…. how about vests? :)"

    Yes, she is. LOL LOL I used to, many moons ago...

    "Bring it on!"

    Here she is:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYpWSXGHfbc

    "LOL, with or without thorns? LOL"

    LOL why, LS...for you...only with thorns, obviously LOL ;)!

    "LOL, excellent. You should be very encouraged!"

    LOL LOL that is why you are one of my favourite guys in the world :)!

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi! Fado and Saudade have come in very handy for this comment. As fate would have it, something that had been missing for sometime was found in Portugal and has only just been returned to Australia.

    A Catalina flying boat that was once used in Portugal as a fire bomber has been recently restored there by enthusiasts from both countries who have worked long and hard to get it flying again.

    During World War Two, planes such as these defended the Northern end of Australia, namely Darwin, from the invading Japanese Army.

    It will hold pride of place in a museum in my state of New South Wales. Once further restoration and refitting is finished it will carry passengers on short scenic flights.

    Portugal is still a country of Discovery, thank heavens!

    Sorry for not being around lately; life has been very hectic with two busy jobs and I haven't had time to even scratch myself let alone visit my friends.

    Take Care,
    Peter

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi Peter :D!

    "Fado and Saudade have come in very handy for this comment. As fate would have it, something that had been missing for sometime was found in Portugal and has only just been returned to Australia."

    Oh? What is it?

    "A Catalina flying boat that was once used in Portugal as a fire bomber has been recently restored there by enthusiasts from both countries who have worked long and hard to get it flying again."

    I had to go and check what we were talking about here...what a beauty! I remember this type of flying boat being used here (to fight the forest fires - which occur every year), but I didn't know it was Australian. Now we have a Russian one, I believe.
    But I am glad that it was restored :D!

    "During World War Two, planes such as these defended the Northern end of Australia, namely Darwin, from the invading Japanese Army."

    That's what I read in the "Catalina Flying Memorial" site. It has quite a history!

    "It will hold pride of place in a museum in my state of New South Wales. Once further restoration and refitting is finished it will carry passengers on short scenic flights."

    That is great, Peter! Will you fly in it?

    "Portugal is still a country of Discovery, thank heavens!"

    :D yes, it is!

    "Sorry for not being around lately; life has been very hectic with two busy jobs and I haven't had time to even scratch myself let alone visit my friends."

    No need to apologise; I understand, mate :D! What counts is that you are back now :D!

    Pete, thank you so much for sharing this marvellous piece of information (and history); and for your comment: loved it *bowing*!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  31. Hi Max:

    “Here she is:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYpWSXGHfbc”

    - That was some of the most beautiful Japanese I have ever heard!

    ”LOL why, LS...for you...only with thorns, obviously LOL ;)!”

    - Oh my how “devilish” of you ;)

    "LOL, excellent. You should be very encouraged!"

    “LOL LOL that is why you are one of my favourite guys in the world :)!”

    - Excellent…..I know I am in the company of an illustrious group of men….

    ReplyDelete
  32. Hi LS!

    "That was some of the most beautiful Japanese I have ever heard!"

    LOL LOL you know it was not Japanese...LOL...*nodding*...did you notice the difference between her and Mariza?

    "Oh my how “devilish” of you ;)"

    I know...LOL ;)!

    "Excellent…..I know I am in the company of an illustrious group of men…."

    Yes, you are *bowing*!

    ReplyDelete

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