Where Is The Magic, a Myth In The Wood?



By Stephen Cheney


When we look into
even the Common things,
we infuse them with our own magic.

When we sense their essence
we merge into their reality;
away we flow from
our mind of dreams.

When I receive glow from
a candle, alone it is but for I;
When I hold a leaf,
comparing its veins to my palms;
When water flows from
my hands and drips towards
the Center of the Earth;
When I turn a stone
over and over
in my hands,
warming its cold, seeking
its hidden colors and runes;

When I see in the distance
a person,
and wonder Who they are;
When I immerse my being
into the eyes of my Love;
then two become one,
and that one becomes More.

In this harsh world of Reality,
wizards, elves, fairies, spirits,
seem far away in mists of Myth.
But it is We, not they, who
are the magical beings.
We whose spirit can
imbibe into ourselves
the presence of another
person or thing;
and in Return,
we cast our spell of magic upon it
giving Feeling and Meaning;
an Intensity;
maybe even a Love.


(Image: Medieval Lady of the Round Table - Google Images)

Comments

  1. Beautiful picture! Perfect fit to the poem. "Two become one and that one becomes more" so romantic! Are we talking about children? Stephen, while this poem is romantic at the same time I think it has multiple meanings. Best not to unveil them. Excellent treat, obrigada!

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    Replies
    1. Celeste, children are indeed in a magic cocoon, when not knowing impossibilities; many not knowing tragedies; protected from harsh realities by well-meaning parents. The poem is designed for adults, as the words not all simple. However, if you want to share it with a child: read it to them slowly, allowing their mind to expand images. Give them a leaf, a rock, a pool of water; and especially from you a smile. As a bond between two is also a wonder. Sharing is caring, sharing is learning. Children do not really need computers filled with wonders and games. The world itself is a computer, running on rules, filled with wonders and games of exploration.

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    2. I agree with you on children. Parents feed them too much garbage today! I don't have children yet but when I do, I will not subject them to the social media that's for sure! Poetry is good, reading is good and it develops their imagination. Thanks, Stephen, for your advice.

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  2. Every wizard knows:
    The wizard’s scepter; the magician’s wand; the cardsharp’s cards; the clairvoyant’s crystal ball; the painter’s brush; the writer’s pen; the warrior’s famed sword; the surgeon’s scalpel; the interrogator’s stare; the shooter’s gun: That the magic, ability and danger is not in their instrument – but is in their Person.

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    Replies
    1. Stephen, a scepter, a wand, a card or even a crystal ball serves only to open the mind's door to a different realm; but the power lies not in these tools but in the mind of course. Yet most need a little assistance to open the gates, those gates; whereas some do not. People are fascinating creatures. As always, your poem is absolutely divine.

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  3. Magic is real! Some call it miracles, some call it paranormal activity, others will call it something else but magic is out there everyday in our lives whenever we fall in love, when a child is born, whenever a human being does something good for someone else and when God intervenes in our life!

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  4. Lovely sensations evoked by the combination of the poem and the painting.

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  5. Mr Stephen, another beautiful poem.
    "we cast our spell of magic upon it
    giving Feeling and Meaning;
    an Intensity;
    maybe even a Love." - how about casting a spell to draw love? Many in Africa do it but the consequences can be terrifying!

    ReplyDelete

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