Mozambique: State-Sponsor of Terrorism by Proxy?


Mozambique has a great potential to become one of the biggest African economies, yet its leadership insists upon arresting its progress: without human development there's no real development.
Some have suggested that the election of President Filipe Nyusi offered hope for change; however, from what we have been reading this change cannot be produced as long as corrosive corruption festers his country.

In 2010, leaked cables indicated the US was concerned that Mozambican top political echelons (including then President Guebuza) were involved in Drug trafficking. The cables also stated that although Mozambique wasn't "an absolutely corrupt narco-State" (like Guinea Bissau) it was “the second most active narcotics transit point in Africa after Guinea Bissau”.
Drug trafficking in Mozambique is controlled by Mohammed Bashir Suleiman and Ghulam Rassul Moti (of Pakistani origins, with offices in Dubai) with the government's blessing. Sources have confirmed that former President Guebuza and Suleiman are close friends (having the latter inclusively financed the electoral campaign of the former).

Other cables revealed that the drugs flow via two routes:
Route 1 - flying the product into Mozambique from Brazil, via Johannesburg, Lisbon and Luanda, then leaving, by land, to South Africa to either supply the local market or to fly to the European one.
Route 2- shiploads from Pakistan, Afghanistan and India arrive to the ports of Maputo, Beira and Nacala (managed by people directly tied to both Suleiman and former Pres. Guebuza) to supply the mentioned markets.

The opposition is seeking the arrest of President Guebuza (which would lead to the investigation of many other members of the Frelimo Party) for his alleged involvement in two corruption cases (ref: EDM and EMATUM), however how can this be possible when the whole system is rigged by the kickback game?

Under a system such as this, Mozambique will take much longer to fully develop and reach its potential, because the country's wealth will always end up in the hands of an inconsiderate and criminal elite. 
But after decades of state sanctioned corrosive corruption, is it possible to change the way things are done in that country? Yes, it is. If President Nyusi has indeed the political will to improve the lives of Mozambicans, he will be able to carry out small changes without disturbing the business opportunities of older Frelimists, while disrupting a vicious cycle that only hurts the common citizen. If Filipe Nyusi wants to attract big investors, he will have to act.

To build a respectable industry in Mozambique (that will create thousands of jobs), we need to look at the country's National Security threats: the fact that the government and/or government officials do business, engage in money laundering, and keep society, with Pakistani drug dealers is problematic given that drug trafficking and laundering funds is often associated with terrorism. Which terror groups is Mr Suleiman associated with, either directly or indirectly? Does he have any mineral-related business in Mozambique and does he work with Iranians? These are serious questions that need answers lest Mozambique becomes known as a state-sponsor of terrorism by proxy.
Regarding security issues still: a couple of years ago, the Mozambican Intelligence Services invited Israel and the US to train its operatives and the military in counter-terrorism operations. Sources told us that the two countries were disinvited because the government suffered pressure from Mr Suleiman and his associates. If we add this to the sudden proliferation of Mosques in Maputo (NB: compare with reports that Saudi Arabia offered to build 200 mosques in Germany as a solution to the migrant crisis), it should be inferred that Mozambique has a problem and therefore, making a massive investment, that will greatly contribute to national human development, can be difficult.

FRELIMO believes that because it fought for the Independence (though it didn't fight alone), and got a bad deal from the Portuguese Socialists, it has all the right in the world to rule Mozambique forever, pocket the country's resources, leave the Mozambican people in the lurch and open its gates to Islamic Terrorism.
If FRELIMO stays in the same path, it will continue to corrode the country. Development on the paper is not real development.

So our advice is to clean house and improve the system. How? Dissecting Society has a plan. If Mozambique wishes to reach its potential, once and for all, it would do well to contact us.

Comments

  1. I will be waiting in a state of suspense for the plan. Even my "conservative" friends are converting to libertarians, which would imply that the West has determined that more narco states linked to crime syndicates and terror are the key to social progress.

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    1. Hi Looney :D!

      I'm afraid the plan will not be shared in public (we wouldn't tip off the competition, right?) :) But I can assure you it's a good one; now let's see if somebody is interested in it.
      Are you sure your friends were "conservative" to begin with? Cause only socialists and communists seem to believe in that theory...while they fool the people with a false sense of democracy and brotherly love. *nodding*

      Looney, thank you so much for your comment :D. Always a pleasure.

      Cheers

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    2. Libertarianism and socialism are two sides of the same coin.

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    3. Caleb, I thought libertarianism was the equivalent to the European form of liberalism, so how can it be socialism? I'm confused.

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    4. Michael, there are several kinds of libertarianism (viewed by some as an equivalent to anarchy) but you have two main branches: social libertarianism (anti-capitalism) and right-libertarianism (laissez-faire capitalism).
      In my opinion, libertarianism is like social-democracy: the line that distinguishes socialism from moderate right wing policies is becoming very thin, too thin.

      Cheers

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    5. In libertarianism, the ideal is that society is run according to the basic principles of social forces. Hence, no laws and little restrictions. Of course, such a premise is false. Really, the laws or absence thereof is orchestrated by some person, some planner, some leader somewhere, since aliens haven't taken us over yet....and voila! You've got central planning, a.k.a socialism. Someone in the center is planning the society just the same as Stalin and the Party.

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    6. No doubt, Caleb. Very well explained. Cheers

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  2. They tried to kill Renamo's head last Saturday, the suspects are elements from Frelimo as usual. Mozambique is a powder keg just waiting to blow up. The wikileaks cables reveal a daunting scenario and I applaud the people brave enough to go and invest in that country, really. So there's a Pakistani link in Mozambique? How long before Hezbollah sits there too?

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    1. Hi Anon :D!

      Again? But don't those people ever quit...do they really think that killing Dhlakama will end RENAMO? How naive.
      It is a worrying situation indeed. If only I could share half the stories I heard...anyway, we are hoping things will eventually get better. At least they inherited the Portuguese laid back spirit and despite the corrosive corruption things haven't exploded yet (and they managed to maintain a relative sense of peace in the country).
      Hezbollah may be sitting there already...

      Anon, thank you so much for your comment :D. Super.

      Cheers

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  3. Good post, Max! Yes, this is exactly what's happening in Moza today and nobody cares! But what can anybody do when they call Frelimistas they will say everything is ok and business as usual. Pakistani have long been in Mozambique and so the people didn't see anything wrong when Suleiman and his people took over. Praying that they read your words and change things, Max. God bless you and your team!

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    1. Hi Leila :D!

      Thank you *nodding*.
      Mozambique may be on the brink of experiencing a deep crisis over this (that's what's worrying me). I was told the locals are starting to be suspicious about the proliferation of mosques, and tensions are starting to arise...you can imagine what may happen one day if things do not change asap (look at Burundi).

      Leila, thank you so much for your comment :D.

      Cheers

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  4. The result of a bad decolonisation process. Blame it on Portugal.

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    1. Hi Michael :D!

      It's true that the decolonisation process was terrible and the socialists must be reminded of it all the way. However, we cannot blame Portugal solely for what happened after the civil war: other actors were at play (question: why did the CIA dump RENAMO? Why did they let a communist regime to prevail, what did they get from the Russians?).

      But that was then. How about now? Why must Mozambique always be somebody's puppet? Why can't they assert themselves?
      I'm not saying that business can't be done: it can, of course. But I would do that same business while letting my partners know who's in charge of my country. What we have now is a situation where the sovereignty of Mozambique is in the hands of Pakistani thugs and Arab nations.

      Mike, thank you for your comment :D.

      Cheers

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  5. I am not knowledgeable enough to comment other than to say that I despair for Africa.

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    1. Hi Rummy :D!

      Not a problem, my friend.
      I understand your feelings but I'm hoping that one day Africa will leave its despair behind it. May G-d Help me to assist them towards true human development.

      Rummy, thank you so much for your sympathy :D.

      Cheers

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  6. I'm not surprised! Remember when Guebuza threw that showmício when he ran for president? He had the witches there performing ceremonies just to hide that he was doing business with Muslim terrorists? Ha. That country is lost to corruption and idleness cause the Mozambican folks, and I have family there as you know Max, are too afraid of fighting for their own country. No one wants to die for Moza, it's a fact.

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    1. Shalom Raquel :D!

      Yeah, I remember. You raise a good point: any plan that doesn't include the people will be fruitless. And if the people is too afraid to fight for their welfare...thank you for making me think, darling *bowing*.

      Raquel, thank you so much for your comment :D.

      Cheers

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  7. "So our advice is to clean house and improve the system. How? Dissecting Society has a plan. If Mozambique wishes to reach its potential, once and for all, it would do well to contact us."

    You really should try and contact them somehow. You could really go far with that, you know, as a Consultant internationally.

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    1. Hey Caleb :D!

      Oh, I leave the international consultancy to Cristina. My job is to read, read, read and write whatever I'm told to write :).
      But she will be pleased to know that you support the group's plan *bowing*.

      Thank you, Newton (may I call you that?) :D

      Cheers

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Dissecting Society welcomes all sorts of comments, as we are strong advocates of freedom of speech; however, we reserve the right to delete Troll Activity; libellous and offensive comments (e.g. racist and anti-Semitic) plus those with excessive foul language. This blog does not view vulgarity as being protected by the right to free speech. Cheers