Pakistan Decided To Sort Its Mess Out



Pakistan is cleaning the house...

In 1994, the Pakistan Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) created the Taliban in order to have an Afghani government that would be favourable to Pakistan's strategic goals (i.e. keep the land routes, for trade with central Asia, open and safe). Once the goal was achieved, the Pakistani military and secret services undertook the mission of funding and offering logistical support to the Taliban.
When, in 2001, the US deposed the Taliban regime, Pakistan saw itself obliged to harbour the beast it had created. The monster grew out of control, networked with other extremist groups, and eventually it turned against Pakistein. The Pakistani people paid the price.

Nearly a fortnight ago, PM Nawaz Sharif authorised strikes against the militant strongholds in the Waziristan region (known for harbouring the Haqqani Network's and for being the safe haven for AQAM [Al-Qaeda Associated Movements]).

Some have stated that Pakistan is the true terrorist nerve centre in the world and a real threat to global security. They are not entirely wrong because some of the most lethal terror attacks in the world were perpetrated by individuals who were either recruited, indoctrinated, trained in or deployed from Pakistan - e.g. Haroun Fazul (who participated in the twin VBIED attacks Kenya & Tanzania, in 1998, studied, was recruited and was trained in Pakistan); Mohammed Atta, Marwan al-Shehhi and Ziad Jarrah (the 9/11 hijacker-pilots, who were recruited by Al-Qaeda in Karachi, 1999); Ajmal Kasab (the LeT member, the sole militant survivor of the 2008 Mumbai attacks sanctioned by Pakistan) and Mohamed Merah (the Toulouse shooter who received training in Pakistan in 2011).
These facts eventually put Pakistan at odds with the US inasmuch as it was receiving millions of dollars from America to counter terrorism, while probably using those funds to help the Taliban, train LeT elements, to finance safe havens for radical Islamic groups and other sort of illicit yet convenient activities.
Pakistan, struck with political instability (much of it involving the monster it created), suddenly saw itself in a position of being unable to refuse US drone strikes within its borders: that way, the Pakistani leadership killed two birds with one stone (i.e. appease the US and keep the Ogre under control).

When Nawaz Sharif took office, he laid out the poor state of the Pakistani economy and urged the US to stop the drone strikes in Pakistan's tribal belt (one of the Taliban demands). These words were indicative of a policy shift: thenceforth, Pakistan would focus on curing its economic ailment (as opposed to being obsessed with bringing India down through terror and with Afghan matters) and, for that it would need to deal with its home-grown Fiend.
The Pakistani PM tried to sit, talk and reach a peaceful agreement with the Taliban; however, the talks failed and PM Sharif made a capital decision: the time has come to sweep the house, if the country is to move forward once and for all.

This willingness to change doesn't necessarily mean that Pakistan is backing down from an aggressive policy. It wants to improve its economy - excellent, a lot of time and resources have been wasted - but the question is, how:
Will it continue to be Saudi Arabia's nuclear test lab and dealer?
Will it continue to be the mediator of the nuclear business between Iran and North Korea?
Will it resume the gas pipeline business with Iran?
Will it agree to exchange information with China (over its dealing with certain allies & perceived foes) in exchange for even more profitable trade agreements?
Surely, it has to start from somewhere.

Over the weekend, the Taliban offered a month truce - allegedly to resume talks. This may be seen as a victory to the government, however it would do well to undertake an operation to disrupt the Taliban nodes of supply (financing, weaponry, men) before they re-group.

It is important for Pakistan to show strength and resolve at this moment. With the US withdrawal from Afghanistan, Pakistan may become a vital regional player if it manages to put the Iblis under control.


Comments

  1. It may have decided to clean the house but now it may expect to be confronted with a series of terrorist attacks. In fact, they have started as today:

    "Two suicide bombers stormed a court complex in Islamabad, lobbing grenades before detonating explosives; 11 people were killed, making it the capital's deadliest attack in years."

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    1. I forgot to say the source of the quote, sorry. Foreign Policy magazine briefing reported it.

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    2. Hi Anon :D!

      I agree with you. Thanks for the quote!

      And thank you for your comment, Anon :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  2. Massive retaliatory attack today, right? Nawaz needs to realise he has a hard task ahead cause his country is kinda hopeless. Anyway, Pakistan made her own bed and now she's paying for her sins. Very old sins.

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    1. Hi Mike :D!

      Let's see how it will all unfold...

      My friend, thank you for your input :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  3. The US made a bad deal with Pakistan, it poured billions of dollars into that country and for what? To harbor OBL, to fund groups to deter India's national interests, to hatch terrorist eggs that proliferated throughout the world. With American money. So, yeah Pakistan is paying for its sins and the people it's too bad they are weak, weakened by their own government, and the middle class just sits silent as long as it profits.
    Not all can be like the Ukrainians!

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    1. Hi Joseph :D!

      Wow...that is quite an opinion. Thank you for your direct comment. Impressive!

      Joe, thank you ever so much :D.

      Cheers

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  4. It is too late now. Things can only get worse and there is every possibility of Pakistan just disintegrating.

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    1. Hi Rummy :D!

      Pakistan disintegrating...I see how that could happen, if Pakistan doesn't change its course...

      Rummy, thank you so much for your comment, my friend :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  5. Hizballah has taken quite a beating in Lebanon, so it's only natural that Iran seeks alternatives to keep poking Israel. Hamas is the best choice as it is outside the negotiations table. Great thought of the week, Max!
    Pakistan: I agree with Rummuser. It is too late.

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    1. Hi Carl :D!

      Yes, Hezbollah has taken quite a blow of late. While the devastation is terrible to watch, I have to admit that it is interesting to see them being counter attacked. You have a point about Hamas. Thank you, *bowing*.

      Carl, thank you so much for your input on the thought of the week :D.

      Cheers

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  6. I guess the second last line is the answer to the mess Pakistan is in. I still believe there is some kind of a feudal mindset in the rulers of Pakistan and people there are just helplessly surrendering to them or rallying around them living a life in as any feudalistic society do. Else it is a matter of strange fact that all over the world where in the last decade we have seen so many many uprisings over a gamut of local issues against governments and many a times when those respective governments had to pave way for popular dissents. Strangely enough we haven't seen any in Pakistan which looks like a state living happily among the regular bombings and strikes in public places that happen with alarming regularity. A strange paradox. Its high time the people there rise and have their voice rather than bow their heads to the rulers who live their life king size and with a feudalistic mindset.

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    1. Hi Kalyan :D!

      I am inclined to agree with you on the "feudal mindset" - you are so right.
      A friend of mine told me exactly that last week "if the people in places like Egypt, Ukraine, Kenya etc fight for their rights why don't the Pakistani? We need to know why." - perhaps they are numb. I would have to dig some more, but maybe they are less educated than the people in the countries I mentioned?
      But I agree with you: with or without education, people must know when things aren't right and fight; make their voice heard.

      Kalyan, thank you ever so much for your gorgeous comment :D. Loved it.

      Cheers

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  7. I only have one comment to make: this post and the previous one are the reason why I'm called Fed Up Reader, I am sick of Muslims and their violence.

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    1. Hi Adam :D!

      LOL *nodding*....
      Adam, thank you for your input, man :D.

      Cheers

      Delete

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Dissecting Society welcomes all sorts of comments, as we are strong advocates of freedom of speech; however, we reserve the right to delete Troll Activity; libellous and offensive comments (e.g. racist and anti-Semitic) plus those with excessive foul language. This blog does not view vulgarity as being protected by the right to free speech. Cheers