CAR & Africa: Oil Gas and Destabilising Actors


Which forces work against CAR and other African countries?

The Obama administration, since the beginning, has said that it is their intention to "eliminate our current [oil] imports from the Middle East and Venezuela within ten years" as part of its national security strategy; the reason why the US is increasing its oil imports from the African continent (whose reserves have increased by 40% in the last decade).
The United States intends to cement its relationship with Africa due to its increasing economic importance, as sub-Saharan nations discover oil and gas (e.g. Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Sierra Leone, São Tomé & Príncipe, Niger, CAR; Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique) - contributing, thus, to the "continent's increasing importance for global energy security" (David E. Brown in AFRICOM at 5 Years).

This powerful position means that the sub-Saharan Africa will become a fierce competitor of one region, that so far has been the Oil-Powerhouse: The Middle East (i.e. Arabian/Persian Gulf). Such gradual visibility is a menace to Arab and Persian nations that depend heavily on oil exports to fund state expenditure (mainly the amount of subsidies they grant their citizens, as a form of quelling revolt), weapon programmes and the worldwide dissemination of the Islamic faith. In face of having their main source of income menaced, their natural response is to destabilise their future competitor and get him out of their way.

In Central African Republic: The Islamist Assault, we said that Scott Morgan had stated that the conflict in CAR, for example, was a proxy Iranian operation; and that we would add other Islamic actors to the theatre.
Arabs and Persians have studied the West. They know their prejudice regarding Africans, they know their traumas and, they are counting on the same-old western behaviour when facing an African conflict. Arabs and Persians think that if they invest enough funds, now, in destabilising Africa (along with their Russian partners) they will secure future oil exports for their respective nations.
This being said, it is not hard to visualise Iran behind the conflict in CAR (through Eritrea and Sudan), the Jihadist suicide terror attack in Niger (occurring three weeks after former-president Ahmadinejad visited the country) and behind any Hezbollah/Lebanese operation in DRC (i.e. we suspect the ADF is securing mining activities for the Sponsor State, in order to sponsor terrorist activities). Saudi Arabia and Qatar (for instance) are most probably behind conflicts in countries like Nigeria and in Chad (whose army - with the best-trained desert troops in Africa - is fighting Jihadists in Mali, Somalia; and is entering into conflicts in CAR, DR Congo and Burundi - in The Chad Jihad Threat). We are still trying to ascertain whether the recent crisis in Mozambique is related to external influence or not. Regardless of which side is sponsoring which crisis, the fact is the mentioned conflicts will easily spill over to other countries (if not contained) thus serving the interests of the nations feeling threatened by the future Oil & Gas Powerhouse: Africa.

The destabilising actors should realise that despite their efforts to impede the economic rise of the African continent, other powers will fight them for it and the African Union (AU) will eventually look at the conjuncture and connect the dots.
So far, the AU has been reluctant to welcome Western entities, like AFRICOM (that will be good for business), because it fears a new colonisation period; however, this kind of reasoning is also part of the plan designed by the destabilising forces who either want to avoid being surpassed by the US, in terms of influence (in the case of France and China); or want to preclude Africa from increasing its level of economic importance (in the case of those mentioned earlier).

The AU should take advantage of the US and UK (for instance) change of policy, and behaviour, regarding Africa and aim at sustainable development of the continent, once and for all.
Ending the apparently endless cycle of violence, sponsored by competitors and leeches, is vital to get the sub-Saharan Africa to the next level.

Comments

  1. What a shame people are not allowed to develop peacefully, after decades of hardships. Greedy people don't care about the horrors they create as long as they profit,

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    1. Hey Jeffrey :D!

      It is, isn't it? Unfortunately, that's what they do.

      Jeffrey, my darling, thank you so much for your comment :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  2. Without the oil income Saudi Arabia will have a hard time funding her conversion programs. I read somewhere that in the last 50 years the Saudis have funded 1,500 mosques and 10,000 madrasas around the world to promote their Wahhabi cause. Africa is proving to be a tough place to convert and the Sufi School is an anathema to this Wahhabi guys, so the plan is to bring the continent down so they creep in slowly. Great post.

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    1. Hi Anonymous :D!

      I read that too, in a very interesting report by Rohit Singh; did you read the same paper?
      Excellent point. Thank you *bowing*.

      Anonymous, thank you ever so much for your comment :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  3. Salut, ma belle! It has been a while, huh? France does always the same thing, she bails out on her former colonies or on her former colonies that don't butter her up. Ça me fait honte. Tell me Max...shouldn't France help CAR free itself from these problems and then make a deal with them to keep their resources or something? At least the people would be free and in peace...

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    1. Salut Louis :D!

      You are back :D. Yes, it has been a while but I am happy to see you here. I hear you.
      Well, France should definitely help CAR (even more so when there are Christians being persecuted and murdered) but France made some odd promises to Séléka...so, I don't know...

      Louis, merci beaucoup pour ton commentaire. You were missed :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  4. France thinks Syria is more important. Besides, Hollande is done with Africans after Mali and all he thinks he's done his full duty.

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    1. Hi Anonymous :D!

      Food for thought...

      Thank you so much for your input :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  5. African leaders need to get their act together once and for all, that's what they need to do! Tanzania was willing to give Masai land to Arabs, who immediately put a sign saying something like "Welcome to the United Arab-I-don't-know-what-what-what"; this is outrageous!
    I feel sorry for CAR, Mozambique and all those countries because they are in for a ride if they allow external forces to destabilise their sovereignty! I say, let the AFRICOM in!

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    1. Hi Ana :D!

      That was so shameful! Here's an excerpt of that news:

      'In a remote corner of northern Tanzania, Boeing 747 planes land on a private airstrip, trucks with United Arab Emirates (UAE) number plates drive across the plains, and anyone with a cell phone receives an unlikely text message:

      "Dear guest, welcome to UAE." (...)

      That is because this chunk of land in Arusha's Loliondo area near the Serengeti National Park has been leased to an Emirati hunting company called the Ortello Business Corporation (OBC).'

      Ana, thank you for your great comment :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  6. France, a former colonizing country, is telling Africans that the US wants to colonize them? Not surprised.

    Olá Max,

    I think most African nations are starting to open their eyes...hence Obama's visit to the continent earlier this summer. It was a significant trip despite some details with which I disagreed.
    It makes sense your theory: the Arabs and Persians are destabilising the continent to prevent it from developing itself because they are afraid of the African potential.
    The word potential is what should be making Africans think!

    Spectacular job, Max! Loved it!

    Happy New Year!

    Tchau

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    1. Olá Celeste :D!

      Yep, that's what they are doing.
      I agree and I agree.

      Thanks, love *bowing*. And Shanah Tovah to you as well.

      Celeste, thank you so much for your comment :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  7. What was Ahmadinejad doing in Niger earlier this year, trying to piss off France? Maybe that is why the Frenchy are so supportive of a Syria attack (eyeing Iran)...
    Anyway, like I said in the previous CAR article: kick them all out of there! It's about time Africa develops in peace; their good people deserve it.

    Happy New Year, Maxie!

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    1. Hi Adam :D!

      :)...maybe. You know Niger's importance to France, don't you? You may have a point there.
      Amen to that.

      Shanah Tovah, my darling.

      Adam, thank you so much for your input :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  8. Africa has some awful leaders who do not care a jot about their constituents. No wonder Arabs take advantage of it, I would probably do the same if I were in their position of fear.
    Max, since two weeks ago I have been following your thought of the week and I must say that I like it. I click your blog to read it. May I use the comment section to comment on it?
    I agree the Arab League should solve the Syrian crisis, not us. You mentioned Erdogan disappointment: you must be one of the very few. Yes, he asked his people what the west was doing for Syrians and even questioned its concern for their suffering (it was quite insulting to tell you the truth). Why doesn't he and his cronies act then, if they are so worried about the situation? Good questions, Max!

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    1. Hi Joseph :D!

      True. It is time for African leaders to decide on which side they are; but it is mainly time for Africans to demand positive results from their leaders once and for all - the Masai are a great example of that.

      Yes, of course you may use the comment section to comment on the Thought of the Week.
      Indeed, indeed - the west should really sit this one out. They should work to press the Arab League to get more involved in cleaning up their mess. Thanks, Joseph.

      And thank you for your input :D. I hope to see more of you here.

      Cheers

      Delete
  9. You have omitted a very important player in your analysis. China has been fishing in troubled waters for years now and is very well entrenched to come out on top. Quite how they play their cards will have a significant impact on sub saharan Africa.

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    1. Hi Rummy :D!

      I have mentioned China (it is next to France in its battle for keeping its influence in Africa and thus brainwashing Africans against the West); but perhaps I didn't give it the prominence you desired? If so, mea culpa.
      I think the countries that depend on China will have a hard time soon because China will have to cut back on its investments abroad - cooking the accounts won't work forever and they will need to reboot. Brazil has started to feel the pinch...

      Rummy, thank you ever so much for your comment :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  10. I agree China is one of the destabilizing forces in Africa, Max. They give weapons to rebels in exchange for resources under the table. Good catch.

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    1. Hi Carl :D!

      Yes, they are. Thanks and thank you for your comment :D.
      I hope to see more of you in the future :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  11. And while they're fighting each other for the 'top oil exporting country' title, we, the importers will suffer, i.e high oil/gas prices.

    Hello there, Max! ;o)

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    1. Hi Abelle :D!

      They say Russia is also involved in that price hike...

      Abelle, ma belle, thank you for your comment :D & *hug*.

      Cheers

      Delete
  12. Hi Max,
    AFRICA has a great potencial to become a great continent as well...
    the endogenic natural resources are hudge (comodities you may say).

    But as i wrote some days ago, the financial moves are tight primarily by unbalances, and in economy
    the unbalance is necessary so you can mantain a certain flux (in this case at the end, of money)

    People's will should always prevail; the way i see it, superpowers want to take their bite and prepare the future of global consumption (inside and outside AFRICA)as fast as they can. For the rest of us...if we want to maintain our lifestyle this would be one path to it.

    all the best

    GAALARDO

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    1. Hey Gallardo :D!

      I agree; it does have a lot of potential.

      I'll be dropping by your place today. I understand what you mean about the unbalances (paradoxically that's how the balance, the flux, is maintained, right?).

      You have a point - an excellent one, in fact. If we want to maintain our lifestyle, we have to pay a price...we seldom think of it in those terms...

      Gallardo, thank you so much for your outstanding comment :D.

      Cheers

      Delete

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