Comment: Bras de Fer between Russia and the West

Fallen Russian Soldier by László Mednyánszky
Pragmatism and cold rationality are admirable.
The Land of the Tzars portrays itself in a very specific way but it should be believed that there is more to Russia than meets the eye...

According to Fyodor Lukyanov (of the Journal Russia in Global Affairs), Putin's government has three main foreign policy goals:

1. The promotion of Russian culture, language and education system as attractive and competitive.
2. Fighting the foreign media's negative depiction of Russia's policies and way of life.
3. The creation of a "Russia's Friends" group around the world.

The Russian government forgot to include the principal goal of them all: to be the Standard of Resistance to Western - mainly US - world domination (N.B: someone should point out to President Putin that the Russian obsession with the US/West domination is actually an admission of its inferiority complex).

Russia could contribute to the healing of the world instead of persistently playing the role of the world's political bully. Rather than insisting upon resisting the West/US, perhaps the nation of the Tzars should start thinking about making an earnest alliance with it, so that together they can truly bring a piece of peace to our globe.

Cristina C. Giancchini defended once that the Syrian conflict was a proxy war for power between Iran and Saudi Arabia; but she recently added that parallelly it is a Bras de Fer, between Russia and the West, to see who exerts more influence in the region. Russia seems to be winning the first round though because if the world forces Al Assad out who will succeed him: Al-Nusra (an Al-Qaeda affiliated group); the Muslim Brotherhood (that is thirsty for revenge after having been outlawed in 1982 - notice the parallel with the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood and the Tunisian Ennahda)?
Conundrum, she wrote...

Tzar Putin may have a particular interest in trading specific items with Syria and Iran (for instance), he may even be interested in destabilising the region for its own fuelish purposes; however, it might lose the subsequent rounds of arms wrestling because the fall of Bashar Al Assad's regime is a stabilising requirement for the Middle East (and chissà for the world) - with the Baath regime out of business, Iran will lose its scope of influence in the region. This is a desirable outcome - an outcome that would even help Russia if we take into account its Itching Problem in Northern Caucasus.

Russia aims at countering the negative image others have of it; however it incurs a serious risk of failing because, although it has the duty to defend its national interests, it seems to do so at the expense of a lot of people (both at home and abroad). The Russian government passes an image of relentlessness; so one should wonder how it will ever reach its 3 foreign policy goals? This relentlessness is unappealing, unfriendly and thus repulsive to most around the globe.

We would work with Russia if it would finally step into the 21st century and if it would play ball on the right side of the court (we leave it to our Russian audience to decide which side is that).
Final note: according to the Dissecting Society Team, Russia should do "at least two things: (..) use their head and consult their reason when they formulate their positions, and that they check the time - it is now 2012, not the mid-1970s." -- Dmitry Medvedev, on 27th of March 2012

Comments

  1. Yeah, the Reds still act like they were a bunch of commies still! They created a Russia's friend group named BRICS that will all fall soon, you will see...Syria is a freaking mess but I don't blame the Reds nor the Asian Reds, I blame Iran. Iran gotta go!

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    1. Hi Adam :D!

      Although the growth in most of BRICS is decreasing, I am not sure they will catastrophically fall (something that is inconvenient to occur: if Brazil, for instance, would fall; Portugal [and consequently Europe, and maybe the US] would see huge waves of immigration hitting its shore...nicht gut). It is better to have them succeed than not succeeding - learn from the African and Middle Eastern example.

      Iran deserves a serious nudge, without a doubt.

      Adam, thank you ever so much for your comment :D. Always a pleasure.

      Cheers

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  2. I don't see how Russia plays the political bully; not all countries in the world have to agree with the US or Europe. This is a very imperialistic view but again what to expect from you, right Max? I'm becoming indifferent to Syria although those women and children break my heart! Syria is an example of how neo-fascist politics do not work!

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    1. Hi Celia :D!

      Interesting: I do not recall saying that Russia had to agree with the US or with Europe. However, if you take a close look at the text, I might have suggested that Russia should, set aside its obsessive-compulsory behaviour against the West and, work closely with it to bring a bit of stability to the world.

      "Syria is an example of how neo-fascist politics do not work!"

      Would you care to elaborate?

      Celia, thank you so much for your input. Always a good challenge :D.

      Cheers

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  3. I am tired of this standoff between russia and the west. We are not in the damn cold war anymore, deal with it!

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    1. Hi Anonymous :D!

      I hear you.

      Thank you ever so much for your input :D.

      Cheers

      Delete
  4. An inferiority complex is outward manifestation of a feeling of superiority in psychological terms. Or at least that is what I was taught. Russia has been a true and tested friend of India since independence. The West on the other hand has played fast and loose with us and have never tried to stop Pakistan from its nefarious activities against India. I do not hold a candle for Putin's brand of brinkmanship but facts of life for us is that Russia has been steadfast in its support for us. Let us take just one case to highlight our frustration with the West, particularly the USA. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Headley

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    1. Rummuser and what did India benefit from the close friendship with Russia? Suspicion from the west therefore their close relationship to Pakistan. India a leftist country for far too long made its own bed. Russia is no one's true friend, I bet they had intelligence about terror plots against India as well and did they warn India? No because they probable sold weapons to Pakistani terrorists to attack it "true friend"! Indians fell for the Russian fairytale!

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    2. Hi Rummy :D!

      Inferiority complex as an outward manifestation of a feeling of superiority: so, Russia believes to be superior (i.e. a psychopathological condition called megalomania) and when before other powers it feels little, powerless, and thus presents an ever defensive stance? Either way it should just drop it...

      From what I have read (and please correct me if I am wrong), the West "has played fast and loose" with India exactly due to its close association with Russia - so, it would be fair to say that India (perhaps as a reaction to the British colonisation; just like African nations, who after their independence, turned to the Soviet Union) sought its fate, yes?

      This obsolete Soviet-inspired sentiment of "us against them" needs to end - it has brought nothing but chaos to the world.

      David Headley, or rather Daood Sayed Gilani, may have been turned by the LeT (it wouldn't be the first time for an operative, so deep in his cover, to sympathise with the terrorists' cause and forget his main objective). There may have been the case that he didn't inform his handler etc. Too many possibilities...but I have one question: has India informed the West of every single possible attack against western targets (mainly when it was so cosy with Russia)?
      Is India upset because the US didn't extradite Gilani?

      Rummy, thank you ever so much for your awesome comment :D.

      Cheers

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    3. Rummuser, perhaps India should leave the cold war behind her as well?

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    4. My answer is simple. What cold war? And leave what else behind?

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    5. Adam, I am afraid you have got your facts wrong. Russia has indeed been giving intelligence to India at appropriate times. Indian federal structure has been unable to make full use of such intelligence. What Russia did to help India should be clear when you study the Bangladesh operation when the USA threatened to send a fleet to Indian waters.

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    6. Max, please show me one instance of a terrorist of Indian origin ever apprehended anywhere in the world. This, despite India having around 140 muslims living here. Our terrorists carry out their attacks within our territory and are mostly from Pakistan though recently home grown variety from both the muslims and hindus have cropped up.

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    7. Rummuser, when India signed the treaty of friendship and cooperation with the Soviet Union it immediately took part of the cold war by siding with the Soviets. The reasons behind this move are many but is India going to stay in the same path forever? Yes, India like Russia should leave the cold war behind them cause right now that behaviour and tendency are counterproductive!

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    8. Rummy, my friend, from the top of my head I can't give you that example - I will have to do some research and see if I can find any. If I do, I will get back to you.

      Cheers

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  5. Olá Max,

    Yes, Russia should follow PM Medvedev's sound advice and put the cold war behind her back.
    But I understand the Russian political motivations in relation to Syria because it is simply protecting itself: if the world is allowed to intervene who will guarantee that it won't intervene in Russia one of these days? The same goes for China. Their behaviour is purely based on fear for their own future.

    Tchau

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    1. Olá Celeste :D!

      Absolutely.
      Good point.

      Celeste, thank you so much for your awesome input :D.

      Cheers, girl

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  6. Can't agree with you more. I believe Russia needs a different dispensation than the exciting one, who can think distinctly and bring in a change in the way it deals with the world moving away from the perceived laid-back attitude in which it is seen at present. Being a super-power once, it has given way to China in this ultra-modern world and has a lot do to regain its lost ground and be counted among the top league of nations once again. On a lighter note, perhaps the cold war has left Russia in such coldness that it will perhaps take another few decades to get its warmth back so as to people around the globe look at it again as an hip and happening nation.

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    1. Hi Kalyan :D!

      "Being a super-power once, it has given way to China in this ultra-modern world and has a lot do to regain its lost ground and be counted among the top league of nations once again."

      Agreed.

      LOL LOL I loved it "cold war left Russia in such coldness"...yes, perhaps it will take Russia a few more years before it allows its inner warmth to come out. Good point.

      Kalyan, thank you so much for your outstanding comment :D. Always a pleasure.

      Cheers

      Delete

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