Political Epiphany: Syria and Some More...


One
Syrian people have woken up since the sprout of the Arab Spring, in 2011. Freeing themselves from the yoke of Bashar Al-Assad has cost them thousands of lives.
The Syrian government plays the role of victim, using the same arguments Gadhaffi used when Libyans fought for freedom and democracy – terrorists are behind the protests and attacks, to destabilise Syria and take hold of the country [of course, Mr. Al-Assad thinks we don’t know that he, along with his brother in Iran, is the facilitator of terrorism in the region]; but the fact is Turkey is flooding with refugees who do not give pleasant accounts of the situation there; and the body count of Syrian dissidents keeps increasing by the day.
The Syrian people are asking the West for help saying, “What is the world waiting for?” Let’s think: if the West had decided to take military action against Syria, to help saving civilian lives, wouldn’t the Arab League accuse it of invasion and imperialism? Wouldn’t later on the Syrian people accuse the West of having occupied their nation?
Unless...

Two 
Under the leadership of President Obama, the West has proved that it can help changing regimes without placing boots on the ground. Needless to say that this strategy is a game changer, since it translates into killing two birds with one stone: the West aides prospective democratic nations to get rid of dictators while avoiding being accused of aiming at an invasion (as well as saving a lot of time & money in the process).
Having thought of this, the Syrian people feel more at ease to invite the West to help them with their plight, resting assure that the sovereignty of the Syrian People would remain safeguarded.
But I ask: why don’t Syrians go to their brothers in the Arab League and ask for their help? Why must always be the West solving the predicaments of the world?

Three
The Arab League has expressed its discontentment toward the Al-Assad regime; it even suspended Syria (one of the founding members of the organisation) last November. It has also drafted a resolution, presented before the UNSC, in which it called for “a Syrian-led political transition to a democratic, plural political system, in which citizens are equal regardless of their affiliations or ethnicities or beliefs, including through commencing a serious political dialogue between the Syrian Government and the whole spectrum of the Syrian opposition under the League of Arab States’ auspices, in accordance with the timetable set out by the League of Arab States.” Of course, Russia and China vetoed this resolution.
But is it enough? Do the people, in Syria, being brutally slaughtered care about these words? When humans are being murdered for wanting freedom and democracy, when they see innocent blood being shed in the name of power-clinging; they want their brothers, in this case the Arab League, to go to the UNSC and shout, “We will help our brothers in Syria, we will fight for them and depose Bashar Al-Assad ourselves. Will you back us up?” – had they done so, Russia and China would have supported their resolution in the name of business (they would even vie with each other to see who would make more money from the Arabic military action)…

Turkey has a strong army, as do the Arab League nations, so it would be interesting (for once) to see them unite and fight to liberate their innocent Muslim brothers from the yoke of criminal Muslim dictators: 3,2,1...

Comments

  1. Max, great post! I'll be back to comment this superb intelectual production. See you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Max, finally I got home! Your article presents us a very interesting issue: the involvement of the Arab League in solving real issues concerning Muslim Development but mostly Peace. Yes, they should be the ones cleaning the mess in Syria and help those poor folks there - aren't they all brothers? We feel for them, we really do; but I can't put aside the thought that the wish to want the West to clean up the Syrian mess is nothing but a strategy: the West engages yet in another military intervention (meaning that it spends more money that it cannot afford to spend) and loses focus on solving its economic issues - ring a bell?

    I wonder what the real role of the Arab League is, because they never seem to help solving conflicts involving their Muslim brothers, have you noticed it? Somalia comes to mind. When it needed food aid, who provided it? The West. Why didn't the Arab League do it?

    Yes, the West should sit the Syrian situation out...

    Again, superb work!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Max, my heart certainly cries for the suffering in Syria. The question in my mind, however, is whether or not overthrowing the current regime in the name of Democracy will make things better and less brutal or not.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Max, I do not wish to comment because of the very intricate dynamics in that area. You may however be interested in this: http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/91157/the-tyrants-wife/

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Ana :D!

    "Max, great post! I'll be back to comment this superb intelectual production. See you."

    Thanks, darling *bowing*. All right...

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ana,

    "Yes, they should be the ones cleaning the mess in Syria and help those poor folks there - aren't they all brothers? We feel for them, we really do; but I can't put aside the thought that the wish to want the West to clean up the Syrian mess is nothing but a strategy: the West engages yet in another military intervention (meaning that it spends more money that it cannot afford to spend) and loses focus on solving its economic issues - ring a bell?"

    You got a point there...
    Yes, it rings a bell...Iraq...Afghanistan...

    "I wonder what the real role of the Arab League is, because they never seem to help solving conflicts involving their Muslim brothers, have you noticed it? Somalia comes to mind. When it needed food aid, who provided it? The West. Why didn't the Arab League do it?"

    I have. That is a really good question...

    "Yes, the West should sit the Syrian situation out..."

    I agree.

    "Again, superb work!"

    Thanks, darling. And thank you for a superb comment :D.

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Looney :D!

    "Max, my heart certainly cries for the suffering in Syria."

    So does mine, my friend, so does mine.

    "The question in my mind, however, is whether or not overthrowing the current regime in the name of Democracy will make things better and less brutal or not."

    It may not, but there are two ways of looking at it: 1- the people know that if the new government doesn't comply they can fight again until they get what they want. 2- they overthrown the current regime and choose a government they see fit (like in Egypt, the majority voted for those Islamist parties).

    Looney, superb comment: thank you so much :D. You were missed.

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Rummy :D!

    "Max, I do not wish to comment because of the very intricate dynamics in that area. You may however be interested in this: http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/91157/the-tyrants-wife/"

    I'd be very interested in hearing your opinion on those "intricate dynamics" - forget the article, but share your wisdom with us :).

    Oh man: I loved that link! Thanks :D.
    Of course, the wives of dictators never cease to amaze me; I even wrote about them in 2007 (in an article called "Liability"): http://maxcouti.blogspot.com/2007/09/liability.html

    Rummy, thank you so much for having dropped by, always a pleasure :D.

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Max,

    I agree with Looney. It's a precarious situation. Whatever the West does (even though calculated) will cause an adverse reaction in someone, some nation, some faction, etc. Every action will cause a reaction.

    "Why must always be the West solving the predicaments of the world?"

    Agreed. It's not that we don't want to help, it is the fact that we are ALWAYS EXPECTED to help. I don't know enough about the intricacies to suggest a viable solution, but it's clear that something else more sinister is brewing underground.

    Stay on top of it.

    Keep The Peace Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Lady A :D!

    "I agree with Looney. It's a precarious situation."

    Indeed...

    "Whatever the West does (even though calculated) will cause an adverse reaction in someone, some nation, some faction, etc. Every action will cause a reaction."

    You know it. Yet something must be done - the question is: who will do it?

    "Agreed. It's not that we don't want to help, it is the fact that we are ALWAYS EXPECTED to help."

    True. And perhaps it is time to change that...

    "I don't know enough about the intricacies to suggest a viable solution, but it's clear that something else more sinister is brewing underground."

    I agree with you: there is something festering underneath it all.

    "Stay on top of it."

    *Bowing*...

    My darling, thank you so much for your input. It may seem simple but it offered me much food for thought :D.

    Peace Always Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  11. Well, the answer lies between the lines itself. The irony is almost all of the arab league team are dictator regimes. Some may be a little better than the other and some may be moderate than the other, but they all fear about democracy and here's where their is a little bit of US double-standards too, because it seems the US covertly are in hand-in-gloves with these arab league regimes for their narrow oily interests.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Olá Max,

    Well, are you sure that the arab league can take a stand against Al-assad without having fatwas issues against many of its members? Besides, I agree with Kalyan: the arab league is made of dictators and for them to actually do something about Al-assad and the syrians would mean to put in check their own rule. Like we say in Portuguese "É uma faca de dois gumes"...

    Tchau

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Kalyan :D!

    "The irony is almost all of the arab league team are dictator regimes."

    True...

    "Some may be a little better than the other and some may be moderate than the other, but they all fear about democracy and here's where their is a little bit of US double-standards too, because it seems the US covertly are in hand-in-gloves with these arab league regimes for their narrow oily interests."

    A good analysis indeed.

    Kalyan, thank you ever so much for having shared this brilliant comment with us :D.

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  14. Olá Celeste :D!

    "Well, are you sure that the arab league can take a stand against Al-assad without having fatwas issues against many of its members?"

    lol do you really think they fear a fatwa?

    "Besides, I agree with Kalyan: the arab league is made of dictators and for them to actually do something about Al-assad and the syrians would mean to put in check their own rule. Like we say in Portuguese "É uma faca de dois gumes"..."

    *nodding in agreement*...I read you.

    Celeste, thank you so so much for having shared your thoughts with us :D.

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Dissecting Society welcomes all sorts of comments, as we are strong advocates of freedom of speech; however, we reserve the right to delete Troll Activity; libellous and offensive comments (e.g. racist and anti-Semitic) plus those with excessive foul language. This blog does not view vulgarity as being protected by the right to free speech. Cheers