Miscellaneous Thoughts on Iran

The Isle of Death by Arnold Böcklin

Iranian students attack the British Embassy in Tehran and a plethora of thoughts pace around my mind...

Watching foreign affairs analysts discussing Iran, on TV, can be rather fatiguing. First, they all say the same things; secondly, we can sense their disappointment before the American and Israeli military inaction. Watching foreign affairs analysts’ bloody fangs while debating Iran is like watching an even cheaper version of the Twilight Saga.
The US military presence in Iraq is coming to an end; and its presence in Afghanistan will soon end as well. The Arab Spring/Summer/Autumn (and nearly Winter) will eventually fade away as people topple dictators (one-by-one) or as intelligent political leaders make the reforms their people demand for.
So, what’s next on the foreign affairs institutions’ agenda? A conflict with Iran.

The most curious thing is that these institutions seem to be more than willing to give Iran what it wants the most: to see the West yielding to its provocation in order to weaken it even further (it may seem odd but by focusing on the wars, against Bin Laden and Saddam Hussein, the West neglected its economy and went on a military spending spree that unfortunately weakened its economic power – BRICS took advantage of it and Iran rubbed its hands with a grin on its face).
The West should refrain itself from waging wars against whomsoever, before getting economically stronger. However, hard power is to be used against Iran, yes, but in a smart and cost-effective fashion.  

And speaking of the Persian Nation: those who are attacking Embassies in Tehran...are they night students? I looked at them trashing the British Embassy and my immediate thought was “Ah, they work in the RevolutionaryGuard during the day to pay their college tuition”. I mean, the so-called students seem far too old to be simply labelled as “students”; besides it doesn’t make much sense that the very same Iranian students that practically gave birth to the “Arab Spring” would now protest to defend those they wish to topple...

It is always interesting to see Western journalists striving for an interview with President Ahmadinejad and, I would like to know why because he always says the same things, he hypocritically speaks of freedom and human rights, he always finds a way to be obnoxious, he always tries to offend Western Values and he always manages to bring Zionists into his monologue. What I am about to say may not seem correct, but it would be incorrect of me not to say it: I think Pres. Ahmadinejad smokes something before his interviews, and it is not tobacco.

What I admire in Ahmadinejad is his OCD: as a Mayor of Tehran he kept the city spotless and as a President he makes sure that the country is absolutely clean, lest he catches a disease when travelling around Persia. Good for him! It would be interesting if African leaders would follow Ahmadinejad’s example: be a dictator but keep things clean.

Persia could seek regional power in a more positive way, but instead it chooses to be powerful through the sponsorship of terrorist groups such as Hamas and Hezbollah.

Divide, disseminate evil and destroy to conquer...that’s the new Persian philosophy. 

Comments

  1. Max, I suspect that a major change is about to take place in Iran. There are many Iranian students studying where I live and they say that things are hotting up for Ahmadjinejad. Iran has blundered in taking on Turkey and the Iraqis and Lebanese, now that Syria is in trouble will fish in Iran's troubled waters.

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  2. Hi Rummy :D!

    "I suspect that a major change is about to take place in Iran."

    I agree and it won't take long.

    "There are many Iranian students studying where I live and they say that things are hotting up for Ahmadjinejad. Iran has blundered in taking on Turkey and the Iraqis and Lebanese, now that Syria is in trouble will fish in Iran's troubled waters."

    The role of Iranians studying abroad is very important to change things, no doubt. Well, nobody can blame Iran for strategising and I believe that Turkey's latest behaviour has misled Iran. As for the Lebanese (i.e. Hezbollah) with Syria's fall the scenario will change greatly (I wonder if the Lebanese Christians will take advantage of the opportunity).

    Rummy, thank you so much for your outstanding comment :D.

    Cheers

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  3. Some positive changes in Iran would certainly be welcome, especially if they don't require more American blood. I have memories of Iranian students protesting the Shah, but then a short time later desperately trying to remain in the US to continue graduate studies and avoid going home. Amazing how these things work. They have some very talented engineers.

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  4. Hi Looney :D!

    "Some positive changes in Iran would certainly be welcome, especially if they don't require more American blood."

    I agree. This may sound shocking but if a proper revolution is to take place (one with positive results for everybody) then Iranian blood is required, not foreign blood; know what I mean?

    "I have memories of Iranian students protesting the Shah, but then a short time later desperately trying to remain in the US to continue graduate studies and avoid going home. Amazing how these things work."

    The Iranian student revolution was hijacked by power-thirsty groups and Islamists, unfortunately. The same happened in Egypt this year and I am not sure how it is going to end...

    "They have some very talented engineers."

    I heard they do and I am glad for them (they say engineering is the base for development).

    Looney, thank you so much for your excellent input :D.

    Cheers

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  5. Hi Max,

    You are certainly a savvy political analyst.

    …"bloody fangs while debating Iran is like watching an even cheaper version of the Twilight Saga."

    ROFL! I wouldn't wish that Twilight fate on anyone.

    Iran and the whole middle east has always been somewhat of a mystery to me. Probably because I don't follow it too closely. It's like Rubik's Cube, the moment I think I get it, there is a square that doesn't match and I have to start over.

    Ahmadjinejad looks like a Bond villain to me. His defiant stand on Iran's disputed nuclear program, and persistent questioning of the Holocaust is telling of his character. He looks like he's always up to something other than what he says. Either is an awesome chess player or a great actor.

    I think if he spoke to you, you would set him straight on the world and the way things should be done for a better world.

    Great piece.

    Political Savvy Cheers!

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  6. Hi Lady A :D!

    "You are certainly a savvy political analyst."

    Aah, you are being too generous (thank you) *bowing*. I am not where I wish to be, but I am getting there...

    "ROFL! I wouldn't wish that Twilight fate on anyone."

    LOL LOL you know? I tried watching those movies and frankly...I didn't like them.

    "It's like Rubik's Cube, the moment I think I get it, there is a square that doesn't match and I have to start over."

    I so hear you *nodding*.

    "Ahmadjinejad looks like a Bond villain to me. His defiant stand on Iran's disputed nuclear program, and persistent questioning of the Holocaust is telling of his character. He looks like he's always up to something other than what he says. Either is an awesome chess player or a great actor."

    LOL LOL he does (and a high villain too). True. He is on the wrong side of the fence and of history...he will not end well. Perhaps, he is a great actor because he is not running the show, that's for sure.

    "I think if he spoke to you, you would set him straight on the world and the way things should be done for a better world."

    LOL you kill me! If he spoke to me he'd probably urge me to respect him and let him procede with his monologue (that's what he does to all women).

    "Great piece."

    Thank you *bowing*.

    Lady A, thank you ever so much for your fabulous comment :D.

    Political Generosity Cheers

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  7. Max,

    He needs a woman like you to respect all women. I read that he is an advocate for women's rights. Was that just another lie?
    Anyway, I am sure he would think twice about disrespecting women with you.

    R-E-S-P-E-C-T CHEERS!

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  8. Olá Max,

    I sensed the same: the media is eager for another conflict. Soon, there will be nothing to talk about, no one to accuse of imperialism, no worries about the economic crises afflicting the globe, nothing so they desperately need a war with Iran.
    AHAHAHAHA...I agree, those who attacked the UK Mission in Tehran were members of the revolutionary guard (I loved the way you "unveiled" this). I do not believe that students would do it cause they are too busy thinking how to kick the ayatollah and Ahmadinejad out of power.
    As for Ahmadinejad: he is a lunatic and a dangerous one too. We are not to underestimate a person that demands the nation to be clean, when most Islamic nations are dirty (this being said, it's not only African leaders who should follow Ahmadinejad's example).

    Persia is a country with great history and to see it reduced to evil and destruction is shameful.

    Tchau

    P.S: much easier to visit and comment with this template - and it looks sexier by the way.

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  9. I have sent you an email to give you a different perceptive on Iran.

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  10. I'm more of a believer in people's revolutions which I think is a far better way than other countries imposing on the rogue one. Indeed the western economy now needs to surge before they wage a fresh new war. The way the world is today, economically more and more countries are going the conservative way with employment opportunities bound to flounder at the end of the day. So the primary need of the hour is bolstering our economies and regain public support especially for financial institution which suffer from the biggest trust deficit now and after the economies are revived then we may think once again of using force in these oppressive regime countries.

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  11. Great post Max. Down through the ages this area has been a problem spot. So many different types of religions and believes. I believe there are major changes coming as well.

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  12. Lady A,

    "He needs a woman like you to respect all women. I read that he is an advocate for women's rights. Was that just another lie?"

    lol you kill me, girl. Yes, he keeps saying that and I'd strongly dispute its veracity.

    "Anyway, I am sure he would think twice about disrespecting women with you."

    You know "homey don't play that"...with me, Ahmadine (as I like to call him) would learn a lesson his mamma didn't teach him lol *nodding*...

    Definitely R-E-S-P-E-C-T Cheers

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  13. Olá Celeste :D!

    "I do not believe that students would do it cause they are too busy thinking how to kick the ayatollah and Ahmadinejad out of power."

    Neither do I.

    "We are not to underestimate a person that demands the nation to be clean, when most Islamic nations are dirty (this being said, it's not only African leaders who should follow Ahmadinejad's example)."

    I agree that he is not to be underestimated. Good point!

    "Persia is a country with great history and to see it reduced to evil and destruction is shameful."

    True.

    "P.S: much easier to visit and comment with this template - and it looks sexier by the way."

    That is why I reverted back the template: out of respect for my readers. Thanks, I am glad you like it :D!

    Celeste, thank you so so much for your comment :D!

    Cheers

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  14. Rummy,

    "I have sent you an email to give you a different perceptive on Iran."

    Got it, read it. Thanks :D.

    Cheers

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  15. Hi Kalyan :D!

    "I'm more of a believer in people's revolutions which I think is a far better way than other countries imposing on the rogue one."

    Agreed. Plus, history has taught us that it doesn't work.

    "The way the world is today, economically more and more countries are going the conservative way with employment opportunities bound to flounder at the end of the day. So the primary need of the hour is bolstering our economies and regain public support especially for financial institution which suffer from the biggest trust deficit now and after the economies are revived then we may think once again of using force in these oppressive regime countries."

    Well said, mate.

    Kalyan, thank you so much for your outstanding comment :D.

    Cheers

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  16. Hi Bob :D!

    Oh man, I missed you! How have you been?

    "Great post Max."

    Thank you *bowing*.

    "Down through the ages this area has been a problem spot. So many different types of religions and believes. I believe there are major changes coming as well."

    Agreed.

    Bob, thank you so much for your visit (you were indeed missed) and for your thoughts :D.
    Don't be a stranger!

    Cheers

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