One Two Three



One
Ricky Gervais is an awesome comedian: cheers, mate!
I didn’t know that celebrities were such sensitive and humourless creatures. I mean, one strives to be a public figure; it does things that damage its image; its whole life is exposed on magazines (being, thus, the theme of many dinner parties...for some odd reason); and then it doesn’t want to be the target of comedians?
When I was younger, I remember looking forward to watching the Oscars; the Grammys, the Emmys etc (for they were funny, entertaining and beautiful)...but since the 9/11 it seems like people feel guilty for being alive and celebrating things. This being said, award ceremonies, since then, have been boring to death. Then, came the Golden Globes 2011 and Gervais: naughty, provocative, intelligent and extremely hilarious (I laughed to tears all the way through it).
I thank the Hollywood Foreign Press Association for such a good time.

Two
Congratulations to Tunisia and Algeria: “A tous les dictateurs – dégagez!!” [1]
It is about time that the people rise against dictators and corrupt leaders. Hanging on to power for 23/33 years is anti-democratic (obviously) and, more importantly, shameful.
Now, I spent the weekend listening to political commentators saying that these events are not a sign of change in the Arab World; however I completely disagree with them: these uprisings are exactly a sign of change in the Muslim world. I’d even go farther by saying that it is a sign that the Arabs want democracy, under a model similar to the West’s.
The internet, text-messaging systems and cell-phone communications made it much easier to exchange cultural, social and political experiences; therefore, people know how Westerners live and, although not perfect, the West at least has a better version of freedom and liberties.

Three
As a right-wing ethical capitalist I’d like to briefly address China’s economic success.
China is not superior to the United States (not today, not ever). Nowadays it is posh to pretend that the US is afraid of China because the latter invested $900 billion in US Bonds (Japan invested, during the 80’s, $264.4 billion in US Bonds – and it was the economic monster at the time) however if the US plays its card correctly it will remain the most powerful nation.
If the US would decide to stop trading with China: this country would lose +$300 billion/year.
If the US and Europe would persecute the traitors that relocate their business to China (leaving their country-men without jobs, many facing foreclosures and misery; just because they want to practice savage capitalism and brainwash us into believing that we need €1 clothes, shoes, toys, toothpaste, appliances etc – cheap product [in every sense] that poison us), if traitors would start being patriotic and investing at home, then where would the Chinese economic superiority go? Down the Red Dragon drain.

1,2,3...just to be brief. 


[1] French for: “To all dictators: sod off!!” 

Comments

  1. Hey Max! We definitely don't need cheap products that poison us and I do hope the traitors would realize what they are doing: investing and producing cheap products in China, then bringing them back to their country to sell. More and more people will lose their jobs while China is getting very rich.

    Hope you're doing good. Sorry for coming only now. A lot of things (good and bad, but more on good) are happening lately. Will tell you more later. ;)

    Have a good week sweetie. Take care.

    *hugs*

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey Liza :D!

    "More and more people will lose their jobs while China is getting very rich."

    Indeed, that is a fine reading of it all.

    "Hope you're doing good. Sorry for coming only now. A lot of things (good and bad, but more on good) are happening lately. Will tell you more later. ;)"

    I am doing fine, thanks :D. No need to apologise, I totally get it, darling. Oh my...at least more good things are happening, right? Anyway, whenever you feel ready to let me know...you know where to find me :D.

    "Have a good week sweetie. Take care."

    Thanks, darling! You too!

    Liza, thank you so much for your magnificent reading :D!

    *Hugs* and cheers

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  3. Hi Max,

    ONE: the Golden Globes this year were funny. I enjoyed it very much and Gervais was amazingly hilarious. He did his job and I don't understand the fuss around it.

    TWO: things are changing in the Arab World. Look at Egypt - just like in Tunisia and Algeria, people are protesting against the government (and mind you, it is illegal to protest in Egypt) as well.
    It is refreshing to see people going against despotic and corrupt leaders - democracy is becoming as valuable as gold. Power to the people!

    THREE: why are the unemployment rates growing on this side of the world? Because companies are relocating to China. These traitors (as you so well put it) are creating a crisis for Westerners and what are governments doing? They are backing it up while asking those who are being played by them to vote for them....nice.

    This post can make one's blood boil: well done!

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  4. Hi Max,

    I like the different complexions of this post. It's a mini smorgasbord. Delicious. I haven't watched award shows for several years. What started off as noble (to award good work) is an atrocious show full of fake smiles, self-righteousness and banal sycophantism.

    I didn't watch the Golden Globes but I heard about Gervais so I saw the clip and LOVED it. It WAS funny. The same thing happened at another award show when Sasha Baron Cohen said something that didn't go over well with the audience. Hollywood claims to love the British but when they host American shows, it's a different story.

    It's amazing how we can learn about other cultures through technology. It's good that it can be used for positive measures instead of negative ones. "To all dictators: sod off!!” I have to remember this.

    China. China. China. The first thing that comes to mind is, "Allo me old china. (Hello my old mate)" Yes, Cockney rhyming slang. The second thing that comes to mind when I hear China is Mikasa. But further to your point, China executes three times as many people as the rest of the world COMBINED... and uses mobile execution vans for efficiency; has atrocious human rights record; citizens have to drink polluted water, it is reported to have 274 protests a day from citizens trying to have basic rights.

    It just seems suspect that China is America's landlord. What is really happening behind closed doors? It makes you wonder doesn't it. It's probably not a bad idea to learn Chinese before it becomes mandatory for U.S. citizens. Can you imagine? I wonder how that would change the face of rap music. ;D

    Exceptional food for thought my dear. Kudos!

    123 Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Do we comment on door number 1? Or number 2? Or number 3?

    I am still wondering about these middle east events. My instincts are that the trigger was the increase in world food prices, which is due to the use of biofuels in the west. As for where it is heading, the news was saying that thousands of militants have been freed in one country by the mobs, while Islamist leaders are returning. The West may look at this as a revolution to bring about secular democracy instead of dictatorship, but I have a suspicion that most of the rioters don't look at things that way.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Just adding to the last, I remember the revolution in Iran - I was a grad student. So much of what is happening now seems to be similar to then, but there are also some differences. Due to the dynamics of the Cold War, the Shah of Iran had been greatly favored by the US so that getting rid of the dictator and sticking it to the US were synonyms.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Ana :D!

    "ONE: the Golden Globes this year were funny. I enjoyed it very much and Gervais was amazingly hilarious. He did his job and I don't understand the fuss around it."

    Agreed.

    "TWO: things are changing in the Arab World. Look at Egypt - just like in Tunisia and Algeria, people are protesting against the government (and mind you, it is illegal to protest in Egypt) as well.
    It is refreshing to see people going against despotic and corrupt leaders - democracy is becoming as valuable as gold. Power to the people!"

    If my country were being ravaged by 45% of unemployment rates, I too would be protesting and calling for the government to step-down. It is shameful! And the leaders of these countries have billions stashed in Europe while their people practically starve. Now, this is exactly the kind of thing that gives way to radical lefty governments or even radical religious administrations - I hope none of the sort take over these nations.

    "THREE: why are the unemployment rates growing on this side of the world? Because companies are relocating to China. These traitors (as you so well put it) are creating a crisis for Westerners and what are governments doing? They are backing it up while asking those who are being played by them to vote for them....nice."

    Indeed, it is like politicians are saying "vote for me and I guarantee you that I will sc**w you!"...shocking *nodding*.

    "This post can make one's blood boil: well done!"

    LOL thanks, Ana :D!

    Ana, it is always a pleasure to have you here; thanks for your input :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Lady A :D!

    "I like the different complexions of this post. It's a mini smorgasbord. Delicious. I haven't watched award shows for several years. What started off as noble (to award good work) is an atrocious show full of fake smiles, self-righteousness and banal sycophantism."

    I am glad you liked it, thanks :D.
    I agree with you on the award shows.

    "I didn't watch the Golden Globes but I heard about Gervais so I saw the clip and LOVED it. It WAS funny. The same thing happened at another award show when Sasha Baron Cohen said something that didn't go over well with the audience. Hollywood claims to love the British but when they host American shows, it's a different story."

    LOL it WAS funny. Oh yeah, I remember Sasha Baron Cohen: he made a joke about Madonna and Guy Ritchie - hilarious!

    "China. China. China. The first thing that comes to mind is, "Allo me old china. (Hello my old mate)" Yes, Cockney rhyming slang. The second thing that comes to mind when I hear China is Mikasa. But further to your point, China executes three times as many people as the rest of the world COMBINED... and uses mobile execution vans for efficiency; has atrocious human rights record; citizens have to drink polluted water, it is reported to have 274 protests a day from citizens trying to have basic rights."

    LOL ^5! Yes, China's record of human rights violations is appalling. Indeed, the Chinese are starting to protest too - another sign of change.

    "It just seems suspect that China is America's landlord."

    I don't think it is.

    "What is really happening behind closed doors? It makes you wonder doesn't it. It's probably not a bad idea to learn Chinese before it becomes mandatory for U.S. citizens. Can you imagine? I wonder how that would change the face of rap music. ;D"

    Indeed. LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL ah, you kill me!
    However, it is not a bad idea to learn one of the Chinese dialects...

    "Exceptional food for thought my dear. Kudos!"

    Obrigada! :D

    Lady A, thank you so much for your input :D! It is a pleasure to hear from you!

    123 Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Looney :D!

    "I am still wondering about these middle east events. My instincts are that the trigger was the increase in world food prices, which is due to the use of biofuels in the west."

    That too. Another trigger was the 40-45% unemployment rates, despotism and, in the Egyptian case at least, oppression.

    " As for where it is heading, the news was saying that thousands of militants have been freed in one country by the mobs, while Islamist leaders are returning. The West may look at this as a revolution to bring about secular democracy instead of dictatorship, but I have a suspicion that most of the rioters don't look at things that way."

    The militants have already been jailed again. I still think it is a revolution towards democracy, however I don't think it will be totally secular (well, no democracy is totally secular, is it? Not even the American).
    However, I do understand your concern...let's see how it will all work out. What do you think about Mohammed Elbaradei?

    Looney, thank you a lot for your comment :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  10. Looney,

    "Just adding to the last, I remember the revolution in Iran - I was a grad student. So much of what is happening now seems to be similar to then, but there are also some differences. Due to the dynamics of the Cold War, the Shah of Iran had been greatly favored by the US so that getting rid of the dictator and sticking it to the US were synonyms."

    I see what you mean. Some Egyptians are also relating Mubarak to the US (they say that the US speak of democracy but supported a dictator...)...the complexity of politics.

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi! How are you - hope you're doing well! Now, Ricky Gervais? Poms, both our friend and foe here Down Under, and even though they like to whinge a bit, they will always hold a special place in our hearts, even more so, if they continue to loose at the one day cricket matches.

    Just finished watching President Hosni Mubarak's speech. Boy, is he in for more trouble by not stepping down immediately! Just hope the army continues to behave themselves.

    China? Isn't everything made there now? BTW China surpassed Japan to become Australia's largest export market in 2009. Yes, they have us by the short and curlies - works both ways I suppose.

    I don't give two hoots whose superior as long as cold wars etc don't raise their ugly heads again.

    Take Care,
    Peter

    ReplyDelete
  12. Max,

    "What do you think about Mohammed Elbaradei?"

    I have been checking on the net to find out about him. Looks like he is both a super elite intellectualoid and an uber bureaucrat. How that will play out in a real position in the real world is hard to say ...

    What do you think about him?

    ReplyDelete
  13. More on Mohammed Elbaradei ...

    There is one knowledgeable person who thinks he is a classic Islamist.

    http://townhall.com/columnists/MonaCharen/2011/02/01/liberals_make_revolutions;_extremists_benefit_from_them/page/2

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi Peter :D!

    "How are you - hope you're doing well!"

    I am doing fine, thank you :D. And yourself, my friend?

    "Now, Ricky Gervais? Poms, both our friend and foe here Down Under, and even though they like to whinge a bit, they will always hold a special place in our hearts, even more so, if they continue to loose at the one day cricket matches."

    LOL really? LOL LOL LOL LOL...I hear you!

    "Just finished watching President Hosni Mubarak's speech. Boy, is he in for more trouble by not stepping down immediately! Just hope the army continues to behave themselves."

    It sure seems that way. The army's behaviour has been puzzling me...I think they have an agenda of their own (their behaviour is quite political at this moment..."me thinks").

    "China? Isn't everything made there now? BTW China surpassed Japan to become Australia's largest export market in 2009. Yes, they have us by the short and curlies - works both ways I suppose."

    LOL almost everything, yes. It works both ways...

    "I don't give two hoots whose superior as long as cold wars etc don't raise their ugly heads again."

    Peter, we have been in some sort of cold war for quite some time...however, the tension doesn't seem to be so high like in the 60's.

    Peter, my friend, thank you a million times for your awesome input :D.

    Cheers

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  15. Hey Looney :D!

    "«What do you think about Mohammed Elbaradei?» I have been checking on the net to find out about him. Looks like he is both a super elite intellectualoid and an uber bureaucrat. How that will play out in a real position in the real world is hard to say ...What do you think about him?"

    "intellectualoid"? LOL LOL loved it! Indeed, he seems to be an intellectual but then there is something that draws us back...
    Well, if we look at his behaviour when he held the top position at IAEA, where he tried to do politics when it was not his job to do so (I think Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice even "rebuked" him for doing so), we can infer that leading Egypt has always been on his agenda (he just decided to take a long path to reach his goal, lest being confused with the usual types of Muslim politicians and to form some Western alliances, perhaps). Another thing we can infer is his sympathy towards Iran - and this is where things can get less sympathetic if he ever gets hold of power in Egypt (and so far he seems [with emphasis on "seems"] to be the best candidate...- and when I say best, I mean best known given his former job at the IAEA and Nobel Prize).
    People say he is impartial...but we should read in-between the lines: is he impartial or is he just doing good old politics in a whole new way?

    ReplyDelete
  16. Looney,

    "There is one knowledgeable person who thinks he is a classic Islamist."

    Thanks for the link - great stuff! Indeed, like I had said in the previous comment: his sympathy towards Iran could be an issue. He liked to send subliminal messages towards Israel, implying that this country was obsessed with bombing Iran (at least that's what one can infer from "the new crazies" who keep suggesting that Iran should be attacked).

    Elbaradei may be a moderate, but as we have seen moderate Muslims are too lenient towards Islamists: they seem to be incapable of denouncing the crimes perpetrated by Islamic radicals.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hey Max! We have not announced it yet but I'd you to be the first to know that we're going to have twins! No, not mine but my daughter's. I'm going to be a grandma and I'm too excited. :)

    Have a terrific weekend sweetie! *hugs*

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  18. Hi Liza :D!

    OMG!!! Congratulations! You have a double reason to celebrate then :D! I am extremely happy for you and your daughter *hug*!

    May God bless you and your baby girl!

    Thanks for having shared this with me :D!

    Hugs

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  19. I love your expression "savage capitalism," Max, and agree with you on this point.

    Actually I agree with you on everything you've said, and I certainly hope that democracy will take root around the world, especially in those repressive societies that need it the most. Tragedy wears billion of faces, those who are born into the terrible hopelessness born of tyranny.

    I like your photo and title, so clever for tying together the points in your post.

    Here's to you, dear Max, for your communicativeness and wonderful spirit of inquiry!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi Lynda :D!

    "I love your expression "savage capitalism," Max, and agree with you on this point."

    Thank you *bowing*!

    "Actually I agree with you on everything you've said, and I certainly hope that democracy will take root around the world, especially in those repressive societies that need it the most. Tragedy wears billion of faces, those who are born into the terrible hopelessness born of tyranny."

    I hope so too - can you imagine a world living fully in democracy? It must be quite interesting; and I am curious to see what new challenges would arise from there on...
    Indeed, my friend, indeed...

    "I like your photo and title, so clever for tying together the points in your post."

    Thanks *bowing*!

    "Here's to you, dear Max, for your communicativeness and wonderful spirit of inquiry!"

    Aaah, Lynda...one of these days you will manage the unmanageable: make me blush LOL ;).

    My darling, thank you ever so much for your most valuable input! :D

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete

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