Children of Empire


The Portuguese Empire was the longest of all European Outremer empires, lasting nearly 6 centuries (1415-2002). 

There are three different dates for the fall of the Empire: 
  1. De facto end: 1975, when the Portuguese colonies proclaimed, at the same time, their independence and/or saw it being recognized by Portugal (except Macau).
  2. De jure end: 20th of December of 1999, when Macau – the last territory under the Portuguese administration – was returned to the People’s Republic of China.
  3. Real de jure end: 2002, when Portugal recognized the sovereignty of East-Timor, upon its liberation from the Indonesian occupation. 
Yet the most painful of all was the de facto end, in 1975. 
The decolonization process was poorly done (among many things: the rights of the citizens that lived in African territories, and considered themselves Portuguese, were not clear in the decolonization agreement; Portugal failed to offer collaterals against the properties that its citizens owned in African [so after the decolonisation many lost all their possessions and returned to Portugal empty handed]; and they passed on the government of the territories to unprepared people, without setting up a transitional government, ignoring thus the consequences of such a reckless act). 

Portugal let down the Children of its empire. 


The soldiers that fought in the overseas war
These children of the empire fought to defend their nation’s imperialistic sovereignty; came back defeated, with psychological and physical scars and, what did Portugal do? It didn’t give them any support; it didn’t recognise their job, their sacrifices, their patriotic duty; it didn’t even compensate them as it has been promising for years – they will die and still not see a dime.

The African assimilated
These children of the empire that were forced to sing the Portuguese national anthem (many without even having visited Portugal, ever), the anthem of the “Mocidade Portuguesa” (the Portuguese Youth – a fascist youth association, to which all had to belong), any anthem that Portugal would come up with; that were forced to know the rivers, the railway tracks, roads and all the Royal Dynasties of Portugal (by heart); that were “encouraged” to lead a more European life-style, since it was more civilised...when arriving to Portugal, after the decolonisation, had to go through a naturalisation process even though they had documents stating that they had been Portuguese all their lives. 

The Portuguese who lived in Africa
These children of the empire lost everything they had built in the African territories, and by decree of the vengeful new African leaders they had to leave the countries (where many had grown up in) in 24 hours, being allowed to carry only 20kgs of all their possessions – this operation was called 24/20. Upon their arrival to Portugal they were labelled as “Os Retornados” (the returning ones), and classified as second class citizens. 
Interestingly enough they (along with the assimilated) were the ones who cleaned and developed Portugal (for when they arrived there, Portugal was a pitiful country whose capital was surrounded by slums – which didn’t exist in their African nations prior to 1975 – and didn’t have high buildings, which existed already, for example, in Mozambique).

The Children of the children of the empire
They grew up listening to how despicable Portugal was in 1975-1977; how in Africa Coca-cola existed for ages (Mozambicans were called “The Coca-colas”), and Portugal ignored what it was all about (note: it only had Coca-cola in 1984); and how socialism had ruined the work of their parents in the African territories “Yes, they deserved their independence; but not like it was done!”...
These kids have a mix of love and hate for Portugal. Love because they know nothing else but their own country; and hate because of what it did to their parents. 

The Portuguese way of dealing with the decolonisation
Anyone questioning it is a fascist. Not to teach it in our schools, thus proving to not have pride in its History. To Hope that everyone will obliterate it as time goes by. 

However the Children of the Empire will never let the Portuguese dark page of history die. They will pass it on to their children, the children of their children and the children of their children’s children.


Heroes of Sea, Noble People!



Lyrics & translation

For further reading on this subject please beam over to LS' blog: Here.

Comments

  1. My Dear Max….

    You are to Wikipedia what a gourmet meal is to McDonalds…delectable and nourishing…

    “The Portuguese Empire was the longest of all European Outremer empires, lasting nearly 6 centuries (1415-2002).”

    - I am enormously pleased that you selected this for your topic under our theme! I find it interesting that you selected the Portuguese Empire and I selected the Ottoman Empire (1299-1923) which lay upon three continents….(although of course I applied a fictitious story to current events influenced be said history…or is it fiction? :)

    Even growing up in Canada as part of the Commonwealth and former British
    Empire *said in a respectful stereotypically English accent* we learned much of the Portuguese Empire in school (after singing God Bless the Queen in the morning of course….you know our Queen that lives in a different country even today) along with the other colonial powers. Although the dates you list may be the recognized dates would you say the Empirical power of the Portuguese Empire had been a shadow of its former self for many years?

    The European colonial powers made many tragic errors in colonization and in ending their possession of their colonies….however some former colonies seem to have moved forward very well and despite the evils pressed upon them have managed to also have positive growth enhanced from the former Empires. I suggest India to be such a place. No doubt the Brits perpetrated evil upon them but now India reaps the benefit of their inheritance of a rail system, rule of law, democracy, a school system for at least middle class and higher, freedom of speech etc….Of course freedom of faith is under threat in India as for example very often people are murdered for becoming followers of Jesus and in many Indian states it is even illegal for “lower cast” persons to freely convert specifically to following Jesus…

    So would you suggest any positive attributes that Portugal left to its former colonies?

    Why has Portugal been so immensely negligent to its soldiers that under girded their former empire?

    LOL Well in school we often were given a special place for UK history in our education but this probably mainly was offered as to offset the wealthy history of our US neighbors.

    “were “encouraged” to lead a more European life-style, since it was more civilised...”

    - Are you suggesting that the European life-style was/is more “civilized”? Are different cultures and civilizations superior to others? BIG conversation here eh? (but also very interesting…)

    In the “Portuguese who lived in Africa” section you explain about the 24/20 operation this also seems to differ sharply form how the Brits exited India…and although Indians felt much anguish about the Brits many Indians have shown plenty of charity towards the Brits….which would you say is healthier?

    “The Children of the children of the empire” section on Coca-cola reminds me for some reason of the Thomas Freidman “rule” that no country with a McDonalds will ever going to go to war with another country with a McDonalds (it was meant tongue in cheek but has some fascinating under-thoughts embedded within it)…how would you then declare a Coca-cola “rule”?

    “Anyone questioning it is a fascist. Not to teach it in our schools, thus proving to not have pride in its History.”

    - Very interesting indeed! Living in a country with a relatively short history we have very little “pride” in much we have done….perhaps we are proud of how we fought sacrificially during WW2…and we are humbled by the poor way natives were treated here…but then it often seems that Europe overly looks to the glorious past and often dwells upon the various evils perpetrated by others (perhaps reflected in my Children of Empire story). It seems that often this is quite negative, Europe often accuses the US of having a short memory and this may be true but at times it seems to serve them well as they move beyond issues often in a positive way…some would point out Obama (a “black” president for instance…)….

    Quite a rousing sounding anthem! Sounds quite militaristic…of course I don’t know the words….do most Portuguese know the anthem? Most in Canada would have trouble with all of the words of our anthem….

    …..by the way was that a short version of the anthem? Pretty long article for you my dear with images and a video!!!

    Very interestingly presented piece of history that opens the mind to many questions and potential interchanges! I am enormously pleased with this post of yours! I also like the contrasts and vast differences in presentation by the two of us….it almost seems we have exchanged approaches in some ways!!!!

    Thank you for keeping me in the lifestyle of high quality reading I expect from you my dear!

    *respectfully kissing elegant hands that typed this ensemble of Children of Empire*

    L

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey Max. I had no idea of these events, what injustices were done.

    The way the soldiers were treated after defending their country only to be forgotten and not compensated is totally unacceptable.

    You got me reading Wikipedia,lol, the 24/20 plan is outrageous, another injustice to over a million refugees.

    You are right, it should never be forgotten and I'm sure with the help of sites like this it never will. I love the National Anthem song, was interesting about it being written right after the UK ultimatum, thanks for the translation link.

    Thanks for sharing this Max.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Max, thanks very much for the informative discussion of the end of the Portuguese colonization. My wife and I were watching a movie last night entitled The Legend of Suriyothai, which featured 15th century Portuguese mercenaries fighting for both sides in the wars between Siam and Burma. I always wonder what happens to a mercenary who is too old to fight.

    ReplyDelete
  4. LSus, darling! :D

    Hello!

    "You are to Wikipedia what a gourmet meal is to McDonalds…delectable and nourishing…"

    ROFL...ROFL...what my God...what is it that you want? Choose the next Graffiti theme? You got it! LOL....*nodding*...
    Nevertheless, thank you for your kind words *bowing*!

    "- I am enormously pleased that you selected this for your topic under our theme! I find it interesting that you selected the Portuguese Empire and I selected the Ottoman Empire (1299-1923) which lay upon three continents….(although of course I applied a fictitious story to current events influenced be said history…or is it fiction? :)"

    I am glad it please you, LS...you know it took me some time to think of what I'd write about, but the final result isn't bad at all.
    LOL LSus, with you we never know...however, I loved what you did with our theme, I missed "Anna and the Abditus Calamnus" already :D!

    "Even growing up in Canada as part of the Commonwealth and former British Empire *said in a respectful stereotypically English accent* we learned much of the Portuguese Empire in school (after singing God Bless the Queen in the morning of course….you know our Queen that lives in a different country even today) along with the other colonial powers. Although the dates you list may be the recognized dates would you say the Empirical power of the Portuguese Empire had been a shadow of its former self for many years?"

    That is why I love Canada, and your Queen (of course) *bowing*!
    I would say that the Imperial power of the Portuguese Empire ended with the Portuguese revolution in 1974. All the rest is a shadow, like you said.

    "The European colonial powers made many tragic errors in colonization and in ending their possession of their colonies….however some former colonies seem to have moved forward very well and despite the evils pressed upon them have managed to also have positive growth enhanced from the former Empires."

    Indeed. But the Britain (for example) did its decolonisation in a very clever way (by maintaining its influence in the former countries - by forming the British Commonwealth or Commonwealth of Nations); whereas the way Portugal did its decolonisation was clumsy and irresponsible.
    Some former colonies do seem to have moved forward, true, but ours followed the behavioural example of its imperial model (and more I say not).

    "I suggest India to be such a place. No doubt the Brits perpetrated evil upon them but now India reaps the benefit of their inheritance of a rail system, rule of law, democracy, a school system for at least middle class and higher, freedom of speech etc….Of course freedom of faith is under threat in India as for example very often people are murdered for becoming followers of Jesus and in many Indian states it is even illegal for “lower cast” persons to freely convert specifically to following Jesus…"

    I agree. And that is why I keep saying: these oppressed former colonies should focus on the good things that colonisation brought to them and evolve. Dwelling in the past and the suffering doesn't bring anything positive...and the proof of this is at sight, isn't it?
    Yes, I have heard...and it is extremely unfortunate (as you know I am totally for freedom of expression, thought, religion etc)...but we could view it as karma. For many years, Christians persecuted other religions and forced people to convert...is this not true?

    "So would you suggest any positive attributes that Portugal left to its former colonies?"

    Of course: our beautiful language (the language of Pessoa, Eça de Queirós, of Luís de Camões etc); the ability to mix itself with different races (wherever the Portuguese went they mixed themselves with the locals, thus generating beautiful people); our food (the Portuguese left in all their colonies the love for "Bacalhau" [cod fish, only we dry it with salt...Mmmm delicious], the love for our pastry, our cakes, our wines, our cheese, our stews and etc); and the natural ability to communicate (the Portuguese are highly communicative).

    "Why has Portugal been so immensely negligent to its soldiers that under girded their former empire?"

    Good question: why? I think it is because it reminds them of a particular portion of the Portuguese History that the lefties would like to see erased from our memories.
    There is one politician (from the Christian party - right wing) who has been fighting for this for years, and he began to deal with it when he was the Defence Minister in the Portuguese 15th Constitional Government (2002-2004); but then when Premier Durão Barroso left the government to become the President of the EU commission...chaos began (as a political move of our then lefty President, Jorge Sampaio, in order to give the power back to a socialist government) and everything came to a halt...*nodding*...and the soldiers still wait...

    "LOL Well in school we often were given a special place for UK history in our education but this probably mainly was offered as to offset the wealthy history of our US neighbors."

    Don't say?

    "- Are you suggesting that the European life-style was/is more “civilized”? Are different cultures and civilizations superior to others? BIG conversation here eh? (but also very interesting…)"

    No, I am saying that they told Africans that the European life-style was more civilised *nodding*. No, there are not cultures and civilizations superior to others, but ethics must play an important role in human relations.
    For example, in Africa they used to wear their "extremely light" garments (i.e. nearly no clothes on)...is this a proof of lack of civilisation? No, it is not. What would be a lack of civilisation would be if they'd beat their women up, and disrespected them (which is/was not the current practice in African tribes, where women's opinions was valued - generally speaking).

    "In the “Portuguese who lived in Africa” section you explain about the 24/20 operation this also seems to differ sharply form how the Brits exited India…and although Indians felt much anguish about the Brits many Indians have shown plenty of charity towards the Brits….which would you say is healthier?"

    The Indian decolonisation was different. That is all I can say.

    "“The Children of the children of the empire” section on Coca-cola reminds me for some reason of the Thomas Freidman “rule” that no country with a McDonalds will ever going to go to war with another country with a McDonalds (it was meant tongue in cheek but has some fascinating under-thoughts embedded within it)…how would you then declare a Coca-cola “rule”?"

    I wouldn't. Many countries that have coca-cola fight against each other...so, a rule similar to Thomas Freidman's would be what his was...a jest.

    "- Very interesting indeed! Living in a country with a relatively short history we have very little “pride” in much we have done….perhaps we are proud of how we fought sacrificially during WW2…and we are humbled by the poor way natives were treated here…but then it often seems that Europe overly looks to the glorious past and often dwells upon the various evils perpetrated by others (perhaps reflected in my Children of Empire story). It seems that often this is quite negative, Europe often accuses the US of having a short memory and this may be true but at times it seems to serve them well as they move beyond issues often in a positive way…some would point out Obama (a “black” president for instance…)…."

    It might sound shocking but...I agree with you. Europe should look at itself and its past mistakes before looking at others'.

    "Quite a rousing sounding anthem! Sounds quite militaristic…of course I don’t know the words….do most Portuguese know the anthem? Most in Canada would have trouble with all of the words of our anthem…."

    It is militaristic. Oh, you didn't follow the link for the lyrics and its translation, eh...LS (you were busted LOL)?
    LOL well, let me share something with you: when I was in high school I was the only one in my class who knew it, who could hum it, who could explain the soul of its lyrics...
    Then I am not wrong when I say that Portugal and Canada are similar.
    I wish the Portuguese would get over the "Estado Novo" era and see that being patriotic doesn't mean to be a fascist (they should learn more from the Americans).

    "…..by the way was that a short version of the anthem? Pretty long article for you my dear with images and a video!!!"

    No, that is whole anthem (we only sing the first stanza of the original written lyrics). LOL it is not that long, it just seems like it because of the images and video (remember, I have a word budget for my articles lol).

    "Very interestingly presented piece of history that opens the mind to many questions and potential interchanges! I am enormously pleased with this post of yours! I also like the contrasts and vast differences in presentation by the two of us….it almost seems we have exchanged approaches in some ways!!!!"

    :D thank you so much, LS...I feel honoured *bowing*!
    LOL we did exchange approaches...you wrote a fiction story and I was more...historical *bowing*!

    "Thank you for keeping me in the lifestyle of high quality reading I expect from you my dear!"

    You are most welcome, darling *bowing*! Besides my readers deserve nothing but the best!
    And thank you for the kind words...

    "*respectfully kissing elegant hands that typed this ensemble of Children of Empire*"

    "A kiss on the hand might be quite continental, but diamonds are a girl's best friend..." LOL this is what came to mind...
    You are a gentleman, LS...

    My dear friend, thank you so much for awesome comment...you were missed :D!!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hey Bob :D!

    "I had no idea of these events, what injustices were done."

    It is unfortunate, but it is true *nodding*...

    "The way the soldiers were treated after defending their country only to be forgotten and not compensated is totally unacceptable."

    I totally agree with you *bowing*! It is utterly disrespectful!

    "You got me reading Wikipedia,lol, the 24/20 plan is outrageous, another injustice to over a million refugees."

    lol...it is, isn't it? They had given so much for the countries where they lived (and many were born in) and in the end they were disrespected liked this *nodding*. What was Portugal thinking, I wonder?

    "You are right, it should never be forgotten and I'm sure with the help of sites like this it never will. I love the National Anthem song, was interesting about it being written right after the UK ultimatum, thanks for the translation link."

    Thanks, Bob :D! It is a nice anthem...I actually love singing it! Indeed...the UK was a piece of work LOL *nodding*. You are welcome, Lord of the Astropics!

    "Thanks for sharing this Max."

    You're most welcome, my friend!

    And Bob, thank you so much for your delightful input...you are a fantastic reader and friend :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hey Looney :D!

    "Max, thanks very much for the informative discussion of the end of the Portuguese colonization."

    You are most welcome :D!!

    "My wife and I were watching a movie last night entitled The Legend of Suriyothai, which featured 15th century Portuguese mercenaries fighting for both sides in the wars between Siam and Burma."

    I watched that movie (an awesome one if you ask me)!
    Well, mercenaries work for those who whose bid is higher, right *nodding*...so they are not loyal to anyone; they're only loyal to money...

    "I always wonder what happens to a mercenary who is too old to fight."

    That is a great question...it must be depressive, wouldn't you think?

    Looney, thank you so much for your input...I loved it! And I must watch that movie again....Suriyothai was a tough lady!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  7. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hello Max!

    We loved your post!
    Italy, as you know, understands what it is to be an empire for we were once the biggest of them all.

    The modern Empires were important for they led the world to globalisation; and we should all be ashamed by the injustice brought to the people who helped the empires cementing their power, and influence over the dominated countries; those people served the purpose of the empire thus should have been compensated for the assets left behind.
    Governments, countries and citizens that do not recognise, value and honour their soldiers should be judged as cowards and not be worthy of a single tear, fear, sweat and have blood shed for their nation.

    Complimenti!

    ReplyDelete
  9. At times, perceptions of history are obstacles to self-growth. They anchor your perspective somewhere other than in the present. Every sensation in you has a specific meaning that helps you undertake psychological tasks. Generating emotions invites you to step back to notice how you permit them to control you. This offers insight into your personality and lessons you have yet to learn. What you choose to notice about yourself has little to do with the subject matter of your reflections. It all draws attention back to your emotions and why you evoke them. You seek to unlock inner knowing.

    ReplyDelete
  10. At times, perceptions of history are obstacles to self-growth. They anchor your perspective somewhere other than in the present. Every sensation in you has a specific meaning that helps you undertake psychological tasks. Generating emotions invites you to step back to notice how you permit them to control you. This offers insight into your personality and lessons you have yet to learn. What you choose to notice about yourself has little to do with the subject matter of your reflections. It all draws attention back to your emotions and why you evoke them. You seek to unlock inner knowing.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Max,
    I guess we all have some country skeletons in our closets.

    I believe that you told me once that you were born in Mozambique Were you or your parents caught up in this terrible time?

    It really is sad how we treat our fellow man, especially those we call countrymen.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Max,

    Firstly I love all of the provocative titles of your posts. Secondly I am saddened that the children of the empire were treated such abominably. To be promised something and then not get it is as bad as having it and it being taken away.

    "These children of the empire fought to defend their nation’s imperialistic sovereignty; came back defeated, with psychological and physical scars and, what did Portugal do? It didn’t give them any support; it didn’t recognise their job, their sacrifices, their patriotic duty; it didn’t even compensate them as it has been promising for years – they will die and still not see a dime."

    Similar to America's war with Viet Nam. Soldiers fought for their country and the ones who didn't get full of shrapnel found that their country let them down and left them to die a slow painful death.

    Every war has atrocities. Every country is ravaged with war - an external and internal one.

    Innocent people get killed because of the agenda of politicians and military generals and the media is controlled as to what they can release, so the public really doesn't know what going on. For instance when American soldiers are killed, they are ushered back to the U.S. at night and the media is not allowed to show the flag draped coffins so as not to rile the public. There is a whole matrix of hiding, shading, and camouflaging the truth.

    In analyzing and making sense of fact, we form cultural and societal constructs. Each person has his own story and the way war has affected them, each with his own truth and understanding.

    There was a story of a solder who lost his eye in combat and the government would not give him any insurance benefits because he didn't continue to serve his county - they actually wanted the eye back like he was hiding it from them.

    "These children of the empire lost everything they had built in the African territories, and by decree of the vengeful new African leaders they had to leave the countries (where many had grown up in) in 24 hours, being allowed to carry only 20kgs of all their possessions – this operation was called 24/20...."

    This is heart breaking. I feel so bad for them.

    "These kids have a mix of love and hate for Portugal. Love because they know nothing else but their own country; and hate because of what it did to their parents."

    Those poor kids. Caught between a rock and a hard place. There's a thin line between love and hate.

    Keep reporting it Max. At least you will make us aware of what has transpired and the truth will be told and heard.

    Thank you for this informative piece about Portugal's past that will probably be altered in history books. Thank you.

    Freedom Cheers.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hey Circulus Ciceronis! :D

    "We loved your post!
    Italy, as you know, understands what it is to be an empire for we were once the biggest of them all."

    Thank you...I am really glad you loved it *bowing*!
    Indeed...Italy was the biggest empire of them all, and it has all the right to be proud of it (look at the inheritance they left to us all).

    "The modern Empires were important for they led the world to globalisation; and we should all be ashamed by the injustice brought to the people who helped the empires cementing their power, and influence over the dominated countries; those people served the purpose of the empire thus should have been compensated for the assets left behind."

    You said it all now. It is like they used the people to achieve their goals and then abandoned them, just like that.
    And you are right, the people should be compensated for the assets left behind...but will they ever be? Will there ever be a courageous and decent government willing to acknowledge the harm done and compensate the people for their loss?

    "Governments, countries and citizens that do not recognise, value and honour their soldiers should be judged as cowards and not be worthy of a single tear, fear, sweat and have blood shed for their nation."

    I couldn't agree more with you! The soldiers of any (decent) country [I say this, because there are countries where its soldiers are the first to harm the population they should be protecting, and fighting for] are to be respect and valued for they are the keepers of peace and security.

    "Complimenti!"

    Grazie mille, C.C. *inchinandomi*!

    Circulus Ciceronis, thank you so much for your most valuable contribution; you know it is a blessing to have you here, sharing my little web-space :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hey Liara :D!

    "At times, perceptions of history are obstacles to self-growth. They anchor your perspective somewhere other than in the present. Every sensation in you has a specific meaning that helps you undertake psychological tasks."

    Not when someone has experienced them personally - which many times is the opposite of what comes in the books.
    But I understand what you are saying here.

    "You seek to unlock inner knowing."

    Which in the case of these "children of empire" is?

    Liara, thank you so much for your input...your wisdom is a lesson to us all *bowing*!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hey Mel! :D

    "I guess we all have some country skeletons in our closets."

    Indeed, we do.

    "I believe that you told me once that you were born in Mozambique Were you or your parents caught up in this terrible time?"

    Yes, I was born there. No, my parents stayed there for two more years after the Independence of Mozambique, in 1975, so they didn't go through the 24/20...however they lost some properties.
    I didn't go through anything, I was born in 1977 and my mother decided that I was not going to be raised in a communist regime, so she brought me to Portugal when I was nearly 2 months.

    "It really is sad how we treat our fellow man, especially those we call countrymen."

    Isn't it?

    Mel, thank you so much for having dropped by and shared your views with us :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi Alexys :D!

    "Firstly I love all of the provocative titles of your posts. Secondly I am saddened that the children of the empire were treated such abominably. To be promised something and then not get it is as bad as having it and it being taken away."

    Why thank you, darling; however the author of this title was LS - and we all know how provocative he is LOL.
    It is a sad affair indeed *nodding*. I agree with you.

    "Similar to America's war with Viet Nam. Soldiers fought for their country and the ones who didn't get full of shrapnel found that their country let them down and left them to die a slow painful death."

    That is awful!! I wonder why governments do this; why do they show such a lack of respect for those who serve the nation (putting it first; sacrificing their own lives - in every aspect)?

    "Every war has atrocities. Every country is ravaged with war - an external and internal one."

    Indeed....

    "Innocent people get killed because of the agenda of politicians and military generals and the media is controlled as to what they can release, so the public really doesn't know what going on. For instance when American soldiers are killed, they are ushered back to the U.S. at night and the media is not allowed to show the flag draped coffins so as not to rile the public. There is a whole matrix of hiding, shading, and camouflaging the truth."

    That is worrying. However, if the media were allowed to see everything what do you think would be the reaction of people?
    Anyway, the media already does a "wonderful" job at manipulating the public, even without knowing the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

    "In analyzing and making sense of fact, we form cultural and societal constructs. Each person has his own story and the way war has affected them, each with his own truth and understanding."

    I understand where you are coming from, however I don't see it that way. For example, my vision of the what happened in the former colonies is neutral, for I wasn't born yet. However, people, like my mom, who were involved in the political scenery, at the time; and those who actually experienced what really happened (not what comes in the books) are capable of transmitting facts that actually match the existing documents left by the socialists and the African governments involved in the independence process - there are a lot of testemonies that are extremely consistent with each other.
    So, I wouldn't say that it is a subjective view of events.

    "There was a story of a solder who lost his eye in combat and the government would not give him any insurance benefits because he didn't continue to serve his county - they actually wanted the eye back like he was hiding it from them."

    What? What an absurd *nodding*...

    "There's a thin line between love and hate."

    I agree with you.

    "Keep reporting it Max. At least you will make us aware of what has transpired and the truth will be told and heard."

    *Bowing* thank you so much, darling!

    "Thank you for this informative piece about Portugal's past that will probably be altered in history books. Thank you."

    It already has been altered (unfortunately) and even so the altered version is not taught in schools *nodding*. You are most welcome, my dear friend :D!

    Lady A, thank you for such a fantastic comment and for being such a good listener :D!

    Liberty Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi Max,

    Let's give it up for LS and his wonderful title. He IS provocative.

    "That is awful!! I wonder why governments do this; why do they show such a lack of respect for those who serve the nation (putting it first; sacrificing their own lives - in every aspect)?"

    They don't care. Government is show business performing for the applause of the crowd.

    "...if the media were allowed to see everything what do you think would be the reaction of people?"

    Anarchy. Mutiny. War. The messenger would be shot!

    "Anyway, the media already does a "wonderful" job at manipulating the public, even without knowing the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth."

    LOL. You have such a great way of "winking." LOL.

    "I understand where you are coming from, however I don't see it that way. For example, my vision of the what happened in the former colonies is neutral, for I wasn't born yet."

    I get you and that is a very real perspective. Thank you for your gentle explanation.

    "However, people, like my mom, who were involved in the political scenery, at the time; and those who actually experienced what really happened (not what comes in the books) are capable of transmitting facts that actually match the existing documents left by the socialists and the African governments involved in the independence process - there are a lot of testemonies that are extremely consistent with each other. So, I wouldn't say that it is a subjective view of events."

    And you are ABSOLUTELY correct. Plus you can back up anything you speak about, whereas others just rely on those books to tell them history. Again, thank you.

    I really enjoyed your thinking on this. I am all for expanding my view.

    "Lady A, thank you for such a fantastic comment and for being such a good listener :D!"

    No really, Thank you.

    Rewriting History With Truth Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hi Max! How are you dear? I had a great weekend, thanks. :D

    Hope you too are doing well. *hugs*

    ReplyDelete
  19. Max I wasn't aware any of this. Thank you for sharing. You know similar thing happened to my grandparents, after the war when the borders were changed in Poland, taking some Ukr and German land. For some reason, Ukrainians didn't want to leave the land so they were relocated and scattered all over the Poland. However, Germans 99% of them left Poland, they didn't want to have anything to do with Poland, I guess border met more to them than the actual land they lived in. However, my grandparents were lucky, because they were given a home and land to farm on. Max thanks for sharing your story, and shall all this never be forgotten...as you re-wrote again for us me to learn and for others as a reminder. Anna :)

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi Lady A!

    "Let's give it up for LS and his wonderful title. He IS provocative."

    *giving it up for LS*!...LOL and I think he likes it!

    "They don't care. Government is show business performing for the applause of the crowd."

    I see...do you think it will ever change?

    "Anarchy. Mutiny. War. The messenger would be shot!"

    Yes, yes, indeed. LOL LOL oh no...poor messenger!

    "LOL. You have such a great way of "winking." LOL."

    LOL LOL LOL thank you...I do try to "wink" properly LOL *nodding*....

    "I get you and that is a very real perspective. Thank you for your gentle explanation."

    Don't mention it, girl *bowing*!

    "And you are ABSOLUTELY correct. Plus you can back up anything you speak about, whereas others just rely on those books to tell them history. Again, thank you."

    ^5. You are right! You're welcome, A :)!

    "I really enjoyed your thinking on this. I am all for expanding my view."

    This is why I like talking to you: because I hadn't really thought about it in the terms you presented (which are applicable to so many situations and historic events, as we have discussed in the past); and then it made me recall all the conversations I have had, all the debates and documentaries I've watched, the docs I have browsed...and reach a conclusion - thank you! :D

    "No really, Thank you."

    Ok...before we stand here thanking each other forever...let's just do our move: ^5! ;D

    Awesome Conversations Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hey Liza,

    I am fine, darling :D! Thanks for asking!

    I am glad you had a great weekend :)!

    Thanks for checking on me :D!

    Hugs!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hey Anna :D!

    "Max I wasn't aware any of this. Thank you for sharing."

    You are most welcome!

    "You know similar thing happened to my grandparents, after the war when the borders were changed in Poland, taking some Ukr and German land. For some reason, Ukrainians didn't want to leave the land so they were relocated and scattered all over the Poland. However, Germans 99% of them left Poland, they didn't want to have anything to do with Poland, I guess border met more to them than the actual land they lived in."

    I can only imagine! When was this, after the WWII? Cause after the Germans came the Russians, right?
    Terrible times, my friend...just terrible!

    "However, my grandparents were lucky, because they were given a home and land to farm on."

    Thank God! :)...

    "Max thanks for sharing your story, and shall all this never be forgotten...as you re-wrote again for us me to learn and for others as a reminder."

    Anna, you are most welcome, dear! It won't be forgotten, ever! And thank you so much for your input and for having shared with us your grandparents' experience *bowing*!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi Max,

    "I see...do you think it [government] will ever change?"

    The players will change, but the game will remain the same.


    "This is why I like talking to you: because I hadn't really thought about it in the terms you presented (which are applicable to so many situations and historic events, as we have discussed in the past); and then it made me recall all the conversations I have had, all the debates and documentaries I've watched, the docs I have browsed...and reach a conclusion - thank you! :D"

    That's what we are here - to share information - ignite conversation - strike chords - delve into the underbelly of debate and be brave in our thoughts. You have a genuine skill for debate - looking at all sides and synthesizing the essence cogently. Thank you for your gift.
    ^5 ^5 ^5! (Triple high five)

    Debating Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  24. MAX:

    I was never sure where you were from, or where you live now. Portugal?

    I think many of us who live in the west forget that other people in the world are still trying to survive and build their lives under such unbelievable turmoil. I can't even imagine their troubles.

    Thank you, as usual, for your informative insight.

    Happy trails.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Hi Alexys,

    "The players will change, but the game will remain the same."

    I hear you!

    "That's what we are here - to share information - ignite conversation - strike chords - delve into the underbelly of debate and be brave in our thoughts. You have a genuine skill for debate - looking at all sides and synthesizing the essence cogently. Thank you for your gift.
    ^5 ^5 ^5! (Triple high five)"

    You are right, girl; that's what we are here for ^5!
    Thank YOU for your kind words *bowing*!

    Happy Weekend Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hey Swu :D!

    "I was never sure where you were from, or where you live now. Portugal?"

    I am Portuguese (born in Mozambique) and I presently live in Portugal.

    "I think many of us who live in the west forget that other people in the world are still trying to survive and build their lives under such unbelievable turmoil. I can't even imagine their troubles."

    I used to be in that position, until I went to Africa and to some other places...it gave me a whole new perspective, I can tell you that much.

    "Thank you, as usual, for your informative insight."

    You are welcome, my friend *bowing*!

    Swu, thank you so much for having dropped by :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  27. This is a great example of why I love Blogsphere and to have met you there!

    I listen and learn, also about European history like this and also get some personal reflections and thoughts.

    Thanks for sharing and I wish you a wonderful end to your week :-)

    ReplyDelete
  28. ~Greetings and Salutations Max~

    This is a very intriguing delivery of information.

    The fall of this empire seems to have been a disaster on a global scale. Why was it not curtailed? Was it because of sociological, political, economic, military, gossip, fashion, technological, cultural, biological or gourmet incapability’s? What change did the empire not adapt to in order to maintain its supremacy?

    Although the United States is not an empire are any of the failures of this empire present in the United States? What place did this empire have in the current continental disaster of Africa?

    ReplyDelete
  29. Why thank you Max, and as always right back at ya,lol.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Excellent revew here Max...I look in Etnias......conrgatulations....

    kisses

    ReplyDelete
  31. Oh, God, the French handled the decolonization very badly as well. Algeria... most of Africa... it was anything but peaceful. And France let down the children of the empire as well.

    I can´t believe it happened so recently in history sometimes. It´s still very painful for a lot of people.

    ReplyDelete
  32. PS:

    Nós estamos agora no Brasil. É Portugês ... uma língua difícil! O acento, a prononciation ...

    ReplyDelete
  33. Hey Renny :D!

    "This is a great example of why I love Blogsphere and to have met you there!"

    You are so kind: thank you! :)

    "I listen and learn, also about European history like this and also get some personal reflections and thoughts."

    True...I love the Blogosphere because of this as well: it is a huge library (anything can be found there) :D!

    "Thanks for sharing and I wish you a wonderful end to your week :-)"

    You are welcome, darling! And thanks, I hope you had a wonderful weekend yourself :)!

    Renny, thank you so much for having dropped by and shared your views with us :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  34. Greeting EC :D!

    So nice to see you here!

    "This is a very intriguing delivery of information."

    Anything to contribute to your database, darling *bowing*!

    "The fall of this empire seems to have been a disaster on a global scale. Why was it not curtailed? Was it because of sociological, political, economic, military, gossip, fashion, technological, cultural, biological or gourmet incapability’s? What change did the empire not adapt to in order to maintain its supremacy?"

    lol...I think it was due to political incapability (socialism ruined Portugal, its former colonies, and if Portugal doesn't wake up it will be the death of it).
    The empire failed in listening to the voice of wisdom - and because it failed in doing so, it condemned Portugal to Political anonymity. If it had been smart (and acted with responsibility) it could have maintained its influence in the former colonies, and it could have avoided the disaster it threw those countries into (ruining the lives of millions of people) *nodding*.

    "Although the United States is not an empire are any of the failures of this empire present in the United States? What place did this empire have in the current continental disaster of Africa?"

    Well, the US has had its failures, no doubt...but nothing that can be compared to the failures of the Portuguese Empire. Despite its failures look where the US is - it is the country upon which the world relies & depends.
    Could have Portugal acquired the strength the US has today? Yes, if it had been smart & responsible; but it wasn't.
    However, Portugal (in my opinion) has had better relationships with the citizens of its former colonies, than the US had with some of its citizens (but that is all in the past, now things [I believe] are much better).

    EC, thank you so much for having dropped by (you were missed), and converse with us :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  35. Hi Philip :D!

    Thanks for having dropped by...and yes, I'll see you in Etnias :D!

    Kisses

    ReplyDelete
  36. Hi Zhu :D!

    "Oh, God, the French handled the decolonization very badly as well. Algeria... most of Africa... it was anything but peaceful. And France let down the children of the empire as well."

    I know...it was equally sad *nodding*!

    "I can´t believe it happened so recently in history sometimes. It´s still very painful for a lot of people."

    For the French as well? A lot of Portuguese haven't got over it either...

    Zhu, thank you so much for having dropped by and shared the French experience...I missed you :D!

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  37. Zhu,

    "PS: Nós estamos agora no Brasil. É Portugês ... uma língua difícil! O acento, a prononciation ..."

    Já sei: estive no teu blog :D! Devo confessar que é um pouco difícil mesmo...Now imagine the Portuguese from Portugal...é mais difícil ainda!

    Beijos

    ReplyDelete
  38. Bob :D,

    You are most welcome!!!! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  39. This season is all about lace. thomas sabo schmuck günstig I am talking about crocheted cotton lace, sabo charms the kind your great grandmother thomas sabo engelsflügel wore. Think of the old doilies she used to angebote thomas sabo make. Lace is on everything these days from clothing, handbags and the rest of the accessories. You will see handbags made out of it or adorned with it. It is made into lightweight thomas sabo flowy scarves. Bangles are big and anhänger thomas sabo covered in lace with matching necklaces and earrings. The thomas sabo kette necklaces have lace beaded into it, thomas sabo 2010 beaded with lacey disk beads thomas sabo online shop or lacey beads themselves. It will not be hard to find a great shirt with lace on the top and accessorize it with matching earrings, thomas sabo halsschmuck necklaces, scarves or handbags. thomas sabo ohrringe Use them tastefully together but don't go overboard. A little of each goes a long way. Handmade is big in this category so don't go looking only at stores; keep those art shows in mind for that unique great find.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Dissecting Society welcomes all sorts of comments, as we are strong advocates of freedom of speech; however, we reserve the right to delete Troll Activity; libellous and offensive comments (e.g. racist and anti-Semitic) plus those with excessive foul language. This blog does not view vulgarity as being protected by the right to free speech. Cheers